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Thread: That was the year

  1. #31
    Join Date: Jun 2015

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    Quote Originally Posted by Macca View Post
    They'll probably have to make the time back.
    My employer gave me 3 weeks off when my mum and sister died within a few days last year. So they're not all bad.

  2. #32
    Join Date: Jun 2015

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    I'm Lawrence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pigmy Pony View Post
    That's the one. It's called 'Human'. Never made any sense to me either. A mate of mine at the time reckoned it was about recreational drugs use - I think you'd need to be off your head to appreciate it.
    I told a slight fib, I heard on the radio it was from some book by a philosopher, or a philosophical fiction kind of author. Just never looked into it as it sounded ridiculous. May look now.

  3. #33
    Join Date: Jun 2015

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    This is amusing, the first link was what I heard it was in fact a (the?) Gonzo journalist who wrote it (or similar)

    https://nowordsnosong.medium.com/hum...rs-678b126468d

    Then this goes into a ridiculous analysis of the meaning of the lyrics with no mention of Hunter S Thompson at all

    https://www.lihpao.com/are-we-human-...ancer-meaning/

  4. #34
    Join Date: Jun 2014

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawrence001 View Post
    This is amusing, the first link was what I heard it was in fact a (the?) Gonzo journalist who wrote it (or similar)

    https://nowordsnosong.medium.com/hum...rs-678b126468d

    Then this goes into a ridiculous analysis of the meaning of the lyrics with no mention of Hunter S Thompson at all

    https://www.lihpao.com/are-we-human-...ancer-meaning/
    Bloody hell, they go on a bit don't they! Wonder what they'd make of this one:

    https://www.lyricsfreak.com/b/black+..._20203374.html
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  5. #35
    Join Date: Jun 2010

    Location: Essex, United Kingdom

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    '72 was just a bit too early for me, although School's Out became the first single I owned after getting it in a swap at school. The first singles I bought were Ballroom Blitz and Teenage Rampage so I'd be a couple of years behind the OP.

    I dislike the "things ain't what they used to be" trap since there's plenty (arguably too much) great new music available nowadays if you have the time to drink from the fire hydrant that is the internet, but I rate the '70s as the best decade since so many genres appeared during those years, at least to me. Today feels more like sub-genres evolving bit by bit, which is fine - I love how shoegaze, post rock and black metal now share a mutual border - but it's not quite the shock of punk to NWOBHM to disco to electronica to reggae that left us reeling.

    The '70s understandably get a bad rap for political turmoil, the oil crisis and kipper ties but culturally it was a step change decade for society and culture that made us what we are today IMHO, for better or worse. Foreign holidays...home computing...fast food...just saying.

    Pete

  6. #36
    Join Date: Jan 2009

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete The Cat View Post
    '72 was just a bit too early for me, although School's Out became the first single I owned after getting it in a swap at school. The first singles I bought were Ballroom Blitz and Teenage Rampage so I'd be a couple of years behind the OP.

    I dislike the "things ain't what they used to be" trap since there's plenty (arguably too much) great new music available nowadays if you have the time to drink from the fire hydrant that is the internet, but I rate the '70s as the best decade since so many genres appeared during those years, at least to me. Today feels more like sub-genres evolving bit by bit, which is fine - I love how shoegaze, post rock and black metal now share a mutual border - but it's not quite the shock of punk to NWOBHM to disco to electronica to reggae that left us reeling.

    The '70s understandably get a bad rap for political turmoil, the oil crisis and kipper ties but culturally it was a step change decade for society and culture that made us what we are today IMHO, for better or worse. Foreign holidays...home computing...fast food...just saying.

    Pete
    What are they? Sub genres? Certainly "R&B" is not what it was originally.
    Barry

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    What are they? Sub genres? Certainly "R&B" is not what it was originally.
    I don't feel that debating whether NWOBHM was or wasn't a major genre is the central point. I look forward to hearing a constructive case that the current century demonstrates as much major innovation as the '70s, i.e. new genres breaking through as opposed to subgenres evolving.

    Purely by dint of popular music having existed for 70 years the scope for major innovation these days is surely less.

    Pete

  8. #38
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    I simply asked what is meant by the label: "shoegaze, post rock and black metal". And what is "NWOBHM"?
    Barry

  9. #39
    Join Date: Aug 2009

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    I simply asked what is meant by the label: "shoegaze, post rock and black metal". And what is "NWOBHM"?

    You can search all those terms. Shoegaze was a late 80s early 90s thing. Lanky youths hiding behind their hair. mostly.

    NWOBHM - New wave of British heavy metal. Judas Priest, Iron Maiden, Saxon, not sure who else is in there.

    Never heard of Post Rock but apparently

    a form of experimental rock[3] characterized by a focus on exploring textures and timbre over traditional rock song structures, chords, or riffs.[4] Post-rock artists are often instrumental,[5][6][3] typically combining rock instrumentation with electronics.[3] The genre emerged within the indie and underground music scene of the 1980s and early 1990s. However, due to its abandonment of rock conventions, it often bears little resemblance musically to contemporary indie rock,[6] borrowing instead from diverse sources including ambient, electronica, jazz, krautrock, dub, and minimalist classical.[3]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-rock
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  10. #40
    Join Date: Jan 2009

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    Yes, I did look them all up.

    If NWOBHM is 'New Wave of British Heavy Metal', what was the old wave?
    Barry

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