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Thread: An insightful look at today's music industry

  1. #21
    Join Date: Apr 2015

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    Quote Originally Posted by AJSki2fly View Post

    I eagerly wait for the modern day equivalents of The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Kate Bush, Pink Floyd etc. to appear, if any of you can point me to some new artists that are promising I would certainly be happy to have a listen.
    This is a point I fully agree with. What album made 5 years ago is still on the top seller list? 10 years ago? Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin have been on the top 100 album list for 40 years! I dare say music of these past 20 years has no staying power. Am I missing something? Are there albums made 10 years ago that remain on the top seller’s list? I mean, I wouldn’t really know since I don’t listen to that tripe.

    And I do realize there is still great music being made, but the major labels will not be producing it, and you won’t hear it on pop radio.

    Russell

  2. #22
    Join Date: Feb 2013

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    Modern music is shit, or I should say the modern music they serve us up on TV / Radio is.
    But there is believe it or not some fine new stuff out there.

  3. #23
    Join Date: Jun 2014

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    Quote Originally Posted by thingfish View Post
    Modern music is shit, or I should say the modern music they serve us up on TV / Radio is.
    But there is believe it or not some fine new stuff out there.
    Agree, that's it in a nutshell Alan. There is good music still being made, but it isn't being brought to our attention by mainstream TV/radio. What we get instead is whatever tripe appears to sell well to the brain-dead majority. The musical equivalent of 'Love Island'.
    Excuse me, are you the Judean People's Front?

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  4. #24
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    Spot on Steve......

  5. #25
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    I dont think you can over analyse this. The industry will always be out for profit and artists want to get noticed. There have always been songwriters writing for various artists...Felice and Boudleaux...Chapman etc.

    I think its part of getting older.The kids today will probably moan at what their kids are listening to. Its about rebelling against the confines of your parents and thats just natural.

    I do think music is getting worse but I cant prove it. I feel a lot of pop now is overblown, over anthemic bullshit. It seems to mix the style of dance and ballads. Just that cowell sense that its getting more cynical. Throw everything into the mix and someone needs to tell them that less is more

    There is good music about and dont forget that John Peel was like an oasis in a TOTP world.

    Putting Perry's Firework on repeat would quickly drive me clinically insane.

    I dont like the term pop music. I think Bob Dylan is a true master and Janis and Joni were from a golden era. I like to think Im older and wise enough to have refined my musical tastes.

  6. #26
    Join Date: Jun 2014

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    I saw a programme a couple of years ago where this producer guy was saying that the term 'pop music' came from taking a song and producing it in such a way to make it 'pop', ie be more catchy. And not an abbreviation of 'popular' music.
    Excuse me, are you the Judean People's Front?

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  7. #27
    Join Date: Apr 2015

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pigmy Pony View Post
    I saw a programme a couple of years ago where this producer guy was saying that the term 'pop music' came from taking a song and producing it in such a way to make it 'pop', ie be more catchy. And not an abbreviation of 'popular' music.
    I think that back when we actually had to put film in cameras, and it was expensive to develop, people were more careful who they pointed their cameras at! Now that digital cameras are free to operate, they’ll point them at any ol’ idiot! In fact, the more ridiculous the better! Music is no different.

    Russell

  8. #28
    Join Date: Sep 2013

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    Quote Originally Posted by AJSki2fly View Post
    Having actually just bothered to watch the video posted on here, I would tend to agree with the comments made above. I would add the following observations made by myself.

    1. To my ears diversity and quality of music, certainly pop or commercial music, seemed to fade during the 90's, by the 00's it had become homogenised into all sounding similar.

    2. I think what is happening today can also be explained by the iTunes and streaming site phenomenon of paying for your favourite songs that you wanted permanently for £0.99, or a monthly subscription. If you think about it for it to work at this level of cost the record companies have to aim at very large mass markets(global), not just the local country home markets. So as the chap in the video says this means air time and exposure everywhere and making songs that are subconsciously familiar to the first time listener, in other words create them using patterns that are known to sell because it has before. So as time progresses variety and creativity become lost as they are not supported.

    3. Luckily there is still some great music out there, but you need to look hard for it, and sadly very few of these make it big.

    I eagerly wait for the modern day equivalents of The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Kate Bush, Pink Floyd etc. to appear, if any of you can point me to some new artists that are promising I would certainly be happy to have a listen.
    Hiromi is a great example of a modern original music artist who just enjoys what she does, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAiBLH8C7LY and as a result produces
    music that can appeal to just about everyone. She has so much involvement and fun in playing- its just great to see her, along with in this next video Simon and Anthony play, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1rxYw7Y45Eo

    So this look at the music industry in the video on Page 1 is pretty clear I think that shows a form of sound which could I say -the artists do not even enjoy what they are doing, rather we might be able to say as depressing as it sounds- they are being told what to do. Talk about selling their souls -

    Now I am sure David Gilmour became tired of playing the same songs - but despite 1000's of Comfortably Numbs later he still did it well.
    If you happen to have seen the Live at Pompeii DVD Deluxe Edition it comes with a look at a lot of Pink Floyd history, and where Comfortably Numb originated
    as a piece of music. So David always did it well, because he wrote the piece of music, unlike today's dictated to (you will do what your told to ), artists.

    The video on Page 1 reveals just two people are writing tired formula music for numerous artists. Its up to the buying music public, to wake up to
    the hoodwink being perpetuated , in handing continually over, cash for trash. Instead the recipe is to before buying music today, see if the artist ('s) is/are enjoying
    what they are doing, before buying. Using that formula, such music should not take long to be replaced by actual music.

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