+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 34

Thread: OK People, lets do this! (Total Newbie!)

  1. #21
    Join Date: Mar 2017

    Location: London N2

    Posts: 1,647
    I'm Edward.

    Default

    Main: Tidal/Roon > MiniITX > Metrum Hex > LDR > either Radford STA25 V or Trilogy 968 > Tannoy (Eaton or Berkeley).
    2nd: Tidal/Roon > Roopio on Pi > Chevron Paradox > Firebottle Buffer > Sugden Masterclass IA-4 > Kudos Cardea


  2. #22
    Join Date: Jan 2009

    Location: Sheffield - UK

    Posts: 6,620
    I'm Mark.

    Default

    Oh, thank you. Iím not sure what I did wrong with my links, I just used Amazons share option - Iíll compare your links to mine. Thanks again.

    100% Analogue

  3. #23
    Join Date: Jan 2009

    Location: Sheffield - UK

    Posts: 6,620
    I'm Mark.

    Default

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B003ITY1..._h337CbP0ZG92F

    Ah yes, I see the issue. Anyway, this is the same soldering iron I suggested but with a silicone mains lead. This lead is significantly more flexible than the alternative and makes a surprisingly big difference in use.

    100% Analogue

  4. #24
    Join Date: Aug 2008

    Location: Suffolk, UK

    Posts: 1,474
    I'm Paul.

    Default

    The ESP (Elliot Sound Products) kits would be a good place to start as their is a lot of supporting information on the website as well as loads of good basic electronics tutorials.

    http://sound.whsites.net/index2.html
    ~Paul~

  5. #25
    Join Date: Apr 2012

    Location: London

    Posts: 578
    I'm James.

    Default

    Mark (YNWan) gives advice I totally agree with. Silicone leads are more flexible and resistant to heat, important issues. I also like the multicore solder, avoid lead free for now, it is difficult to work with, unnecessary, and prone to failure relative to ordinary tin/lead offerings.

    Remember: two things you will always be using in this gig are solder and a soldering iron, so don't scrimp on either. And a 'third hand' and stand alone light/lens if the eyes are not too sharp as others have said.

    You will also need a multimeter, a £5-10 cheap thing is completely adequate for starters, again decent silicone leads and genuine 600V rating are more likely to keep you alive that 43 different (inaccurate) functions.

    Lastly, I would suggest as a starter kit the bottlehead 'quickie'. It is a battery powered valve pre amp that runs at a not life challenging 36V. It comes complete, is relatively cheap, sounds damn good, is well supported online and with plenty of builders out there, and IMHO might give you more of a feeling of satisfaction than a passive pre. It will also introduce you to the principles of valve design in a clear and relatively bloop proof form.

    DIY audio is awesome, enjoy yourself!

    Sent from my BLA-L09 using Tapatalk

  6. #26
    Join Date: Apr 2012

    Location: London

    Posts: 578
    I'm James.

    Default

    Agree with Primalsea as well, ESP kits are good if sand amps are your preference.

    Sent from my BLA-L09 using Tapatalk

  7. #27
    Join Date: Nov 2015

    Location: Wolverhampton

    Posts: 9,776
    I'm Oliver.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jazid View Post
    Mark (YNWan) gives advice I totally agree with. Silicone leads are more flexible and resistant to heat, important issues. I also like the multicore solder, avoid lead free for now, it is difficult to work with, unnecessary, and prone to failure relative to ordinary tin/lead offerings.

    Remember: two things you will always be using in this gig are solder and a soldering iron, so don't scrimp on either. And a 'third hand' and stand alone light/lens if the eyes are not too sharp as others have said.

    You will also need a multimeter, a £5-10 cheap thing is completely adequate for starters, again decent silicone leads and genuine 600V rating are more likely to keep you alive that 43 different (inaccurate) functions.

    Lastly, I would suggest as a starter kit the bottlehead 'quickie'. It is a battery powered valve pre amp that runs at a not life challenging 36V. It comes complete, is relatively cheap, sounds damn good, is well supported online and with plenty of builders out there, and IMHO might give you more of a feeling of satisfaction than a passive pre. It will also introduce you to the principles of valve design in a clear and relatively bloop proof form.

    DIY audio is awesome, enjoy yourself!

    Sent from my BLA-L09 using Tapatalk
    James, the quickie is no longer available and at $99 plus postage and import tax, doesn't really represent the kind of project I'd suggest for someone who, at present cannot solder.

    A passive preamp may not be the most glamorous project, but it has all the elements required which Rob will need to learn and can be done for £30.

    Obviously, once he has built it, and it works, he can move on to more complex projects or projects with a greater emphasis on detail.

    As someone who'd never soldered anything in his life until I started making cables, I benefitted a lot from multiple small projects with low investment rate. If you get a passive preamp wrong, its a lot easier to try and see where you went wrong than trying to decipher valve circuit diagrams for trouble-shooting etc.

    At the basic level, a passive pre build is perfect.
    Analogue: Technics SP10 MK2 > Phonomac AT-1010 MK6 tonearm > Ortofon Kontrapunkt b > Bigbottle Jfet MC Valve Phonostage
    Digital: Orchard Audio PecanPi with JRiver
    Preamplifier: DCB1 with Khozmo 48 Step Series Attenuator or Neurochrome Differential Preamp
    Amplification: Neurochrome Modulus 686
    Cables: SPOTFIRE Speaker Cable & SPOTFIRE IC Cables & SPOTFIRE Tonearm cable
    Speakers: Mordaunt Short Performance 880

    Price List For SPOTFIRE Cables here:https://bit.ly/2Uxiv3j

    Alternative reading: http://www.audioaddictsforum.com

  8. #28
    Join Date: Jan 2009

    Location: Sheffield - UK

    Posts: 6,620
    I'm Mark.

    Default

    A passive pre doesn’t require a circuit board though and he needs to do some through hole circuit board stuff.

    On the other hand, it does require lots of other soldering skills.

    100% Analogue

  9. #29
    Join Date: Nov 2015

    Location: Wolverhampton

    Posts: 9,776
    I'm Oliver.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by YNWaN View Post
    A passive pre doesnít require a circuit board though and he needs to do some through hole circuit board stuff.

    On the other hand, it does require lots of other soldering skills.
    Ah, it doesn't require one but there is a purpose made mine for an alps blue.

    For £3 it's worth getting. You have to solder a big potentiometer to a little circuit board. Excellent practice.

    https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?m...2F202693556056
    Analogue: Technics SP10 MK2 > Phonomac AT-1010 MK6 tonearm > Ortofon Kontrapunkt b > Bigbottle Jfet MC Valve Phonostage
    Digital: Orchard Audio PecanPi with JRiver
    Preamplifier: DCB1 with Khozmo 48 Step Series Attenuator or Neurochrome Differential Preamp
    Amplification: Neurochrome Modulus 686
    Cables: SPOTFIRE Speaker Cable & SPOTFIRE IC Cables & SPOTFIRE Tonearm cable
    Speakers: Mordaunt Short Performance 880

    Price List For SPOTFIRE Cables here:https://bit.ly/2Uxiv3j

    Alternative reading: http://www.audioaddictsforum.com

  10. #30
    Join Date: Jan 2009

    Location: Sheffield - UK

    Posts: 6,620
    I'm Mark.

    Default

    Oh yes, how nifty .

    100% Analogue

+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast



 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •