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Thread: Ever have a bad listening day

  1. #41
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 91,607
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

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    Yeah, but it depends what you mean by "not much cop", and what the benchmark is in terms of what's considered as 'much cop'...

    For example, I much prefer the stripped-back, 'fresh', slightly edgy sound of early Beatles albums, to the 'super-slick/smooth' (for me overly-polished/produced) sound of those of Steely Dan

    Note that I'm talking here purely, sonically, not musically. 'Rubber Soul', for example, for me, sounds stunning!

    Marco.
    To be scientific is to take into account all of reality, not to be selectively inattentive to the inconvenient -- Pharos 2019.

  2. #42
    Join Date: May 2009

    Location: Wales, UK

    Posts: 288
    I'm Simon.

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    I had a bad listening day a few weeks ago. I was playing a M- original copy of 'Kick Out The Jams', flipped the record over for Side 2 and the bloody thing slipped out of my hands. Result - a lovely spindle gouge across Side 1
    Simon.

  3. #43
    Join Date: Jan 2009

    Location: Essex

    Posts: 21,446
    I'm openingabottleofwine.

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    Agree re. the early Beatles albums and all of Steely Dan's output (for which I have a love/hate relation - I'm surprised I have most of their output!).
    Barry

  4. #44
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

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    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

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    Yup, I like most of Steely Dan's music, but hate that smooth over-produced 'studio sound' they seemed to favour, almost as if they knew it would appeal to hi-fi geeks

    It strips the soul/'humanness' out of the music and robs it of the natural 'grit', which makes music sound real, IMHO....

    Marco.
    To be scientific is to take into account all of reality, not to be selectively inattentive to the inconvenient -- Pharos 2019.

  5. #45
    Join Date: Aug 2009

    Location: Staffordshire, England

    Posts: 26,400
    I'm Martin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Yup, I like most of Steely Dan's music, but hate that smooth over-produced 'studio sound' they seemed to favour, almost as if they knew it would appeal to hi-fi geeks

    Marco.
    They were hi-fi geeks so that probably explains that.

    Where I find analogue recordings fall down is if they try to get too complex with the mix. Not that it bothers me, for me the recording quality is intrinsic to the music I just accept it for what it is, whether it is squeaky clean or rough as a badger's arse. How boring would it be if all music was recorded to 'audiophile' standards? That's why I can never understand hi-fi enthusiasts complaining about recording quality. Hi-fi is about replay, not recording! How it was recorded has got nothing to do with how you replay it.
    Current Lash Up:

    *Sony SCD XB790QS* Nelson Pass DCB1 / Krell KSA100 mkII * JM Lab Electra 926 *


    'You fool! To think that your ape-brain could contain the full knowledge of the Krell!'

  6. #46
    Join Date: Mar 2017

    Location: Seaford UK

    Posts: 1,093
    I'm Dennis.

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    Well nobody said that the track was actually brilliant on their system, which is a relief, but maybe nobody thinks that that track is any good and no one has it.

    "McCartney and the Beatles were mostly rubbish recordings, how abbey road got its good reputation I don't know, wasn't anything to do with the Beatles "

    I disagree with that, we have to consider the equipment available at the time, and I loved AR, but that was about the time that Hi-Fi started to become prominent, and there was a shift in focus to techniques and recording quality. (PF and caned boy on "The Wall"). My view is because although the recordings may be rather poor by modern standards, the writing and the live in one take, make some great performances, and that can carry a lot of emotional thrust.

    Agree about Steely Dan, and more so The Nightfly.

    But on the Beatles, I heard the other day "There's a place", one I used to have in my teens either on the "Twist and Shout" EP or "Help" discs. What a song, still valid sentiments, lovely chords, and talks about stuff we can still feel all these years later.

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