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Thread: How much vinyl is too much vinyl for an upstairs room?

  1. #21
    Join Date: Nov 2011

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickbaba View Post
    OK well I had a loose floorboard up to take a look underneath - the joists look pretty solid to me, they are 3x9 inches more or less I would say, and heavy timber. They run across the room at right angles to the proposed shelves, which would therefore be supported over several joists.

    Attachment 26067
    The look pretty substantial. Most modern houses have 2 by 8 joists.
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  2. #22
    Join Date: Jan 2009

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    I'm openingabottleofwine.

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    I don't understand the concern. Let's take Grant's example of a typical adult man, weighing 12 stone (that is 76Kg), and assume his 'footprint' is 0.02m2, then his load on the floor will be about 3,800 Kg/m2.

    If the floor cannot support two such men having a conversation, then you have something to worry about; and had better cancel any proposed parties until you get the situation remedied!



    In my own house I have about 400 LPs stored in two reasonably substantial record storage cases, stacked one on top of the other in an upstairs room. Assuming each case weighs 10Kg and has footprint of 0.24m2, then the total weight of 100Kg (40 Kg for the records + 20 Kg for the cases) represents a load on the floor of 416Kg/m2. The cases are up against a load-bearing wall, in a house built in the 1960's, to a standard where "cost was very much an object"; that is built to the minimum standard!
    Last edited by Barry; 18-05-2019 at 15:21. Reason: Addition
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  3. #23
    Join Date: Sep 2012

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    Yes that all makes sense Barry - the original question came more from a feeling of 'should I be concerned about this?' - then I got worried by Andy's calculation of 153kg/m2 being some sort of breaking point, and Macca'a matchstick loft joists lol

    but yes, looked at with common-sense it looks like I shouldn't need to worry.

  4. #24
    Join Date: Sep 2012

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    but I still totally do not grasp the maths of this - I just don't see how a 76kg man can exert a load of 3,800kg/m2... that's nearly 4 tons, isn't it?

    how can a 76kg object exert more than a maximum 76kg load on a surface?

  5. #25
    Join Date: May 2012

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    Can't you bolt some shelvs onto the wall ? 50 / 50 split
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  6. #26
    Join Date: Feb 2013

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickbaba View Post
    but I still totally do not grasp the maths of this - I just don't see how a 76kg man can exert a load of 3,800kg/m2... that's nearly 4 tons, isn't it?

    how can a 76kg object exert more than a maximum 76kg load on a surface?
    coz he is not standing on 1m sq. his feet are much smaller.
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  7. #27
    Join Date: Jan 2009

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    Quote Originally Posted by nickbaba View Post
    but I still totally do not grasp the maths of this - I just don't see how a 76kg man can exert a load of 3,800kg/m2... that's nearly 4 tons, isn't it?

    how can a 76kg object exert more than a maximum 76kg load on a surface?
    Someone quoted a 'load' of 153Kg/m2. By that I assume they meant 153Kg distributed evenly over a square metre. However the units are that of pressure, so no, a 76Kg man cannot exert a load of more than 76Kg, but the pressure on the floor will be 76Kg divided by the area of the footprint (that is his two feet, which I have taken to be 30.5cm x 22cm = 0.067m2 divided by 3, since the weight is supported by the front of the sole and the heel, not the entire foot, that is 0.022m2), hence 76Kg/0.022m2 = 3398Kg/m2. So yes, the equivalent of nearly 4 tons distributed evenly over 1 square metre.

    To provide an appropriate record-playing analogy: a typical playing weight might be 2 gram, so the load on the record will be 2 gram. But since the area of contact with the walls of the record groove is very, very small, the pressure on the vinyl will be enormous (at least 30 tons per square inch).


    It's a bit like a woman wearing two different types of shoes on a polished wooden floor. When wearing flat soled shoes no damage will occur, but if she wears 'stiletto' high heels, because these have a smaller area of contact with the floor (especially the heel, which will take the main thrust of her weight), the pressure is enormous and will damage the floor.
    Barry

  8. #28
    Join Date: Aug 2009

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    No normal wooden floor would support 3800 kilos even spread across a metre square so there's something not quite right there.
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  9. #29
    Join Date: Mar 2017

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    I think you should sell half your collection, you will save on wood and your house will still be standing. Take a holiday with the money you make

    After all, based on 4 albums a week and allowing for holidays and repeat playing of your favourites you will take at least 10 years to play them.

  10. #30
    Join Date: Mar 2017

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    Now, I am not an engineer but this thread has been fun to read and its got me thinking...

    Surely, it does not matter what floor you are on if your joists are the same then they will have the same constraints on the first floor as well as the ground and second?

    I am sure you would not have given any further thought to this if they were on the ground floor and if the joist are the same then it will be fine. Just don't sleep in the room below

    i am sure n engineer will come along and put me right

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