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Thread: Grim statistics on retirement age and life expectancy

  1. #91
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

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    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willbewill View Post
    My way was different. For most of my working life I had a job that I loved, thankfully it was as a civil servant with a final salary pension scheme. So when the job morphed and became stressful and no fun I walked away with a reasonable, but not full, pension at 59 - over 5 years ago. I do a bit of part time self employed work when I feel like it on my own terms which helps pay for holidays etc.

    But those schemes are no longer available.
    Cool, and I'm glad it worked out well for you, Will

    I was semi-retired at 45 (and still am now at 53), which was possible as I can work from home and still earn enough from my picture framing business, which I'd been running full-time up until then, by cherry-picking profitable/worthwhile jobs, such as hotel contracts, to keep the wolves from the door, but not be burdened by the demands of a full-time job, whilst funds also come in from the properties we rent out, and Del's salary as an English lecturer.

    It means I can do my bit, whilst also having time to look after the house, feed the cats, do all the cleaning and any other jobs required, maintain the garden, help run the forum/answer numerous emails and PMs in the process, and have a nice cup of tea and/or something to eat, ready for Del coming home (to a nice warm, clean house)!

    It's an arrangement that suits both of us, as the bills get paid and we have a decent standard of living, plus still time to enjoy each other's company

    I wouldn't swap that for any amount of extra income, which meant longer working hours and us seeing less of each other, likely increasing our respective stress levels and reducing our overall well-being.

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  2. #92
    Join Date: Oct 2008

    Location: Aughton, Ormskirk

    Posts: 2,756
    I'm Jerry.

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    I thought my wife would get bored when she retired from teaching two years ago. Boy was I wrong. She plays badminton three times a week, joined a walking group, goes off to see plays, runs a book club etc. Most of it has been done through the local U3A (University of the third age). Says she has lots of things planned for me when I retire........
    Jerry
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  3. #93
    Join Date: Mar 2014

    Location: West Wales

    Posts: 378
    I'm malcolm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post

    It's an arrangement that suits both of us, as the bills get paid and we have a decent standard of living, plus still time to enjoy each other's company

    I wouldn't swap what we've got now for any amount of extra money, which meant we would see each other less, increase our respective stress levels and reduce our overall well-being.

    Marco.
    Exactly, that's what it's all about. I also love the fact that we can travel when we want to and take advantage of cheap flights. The only tie we had was our Jack Russell who sadly died quite recently.

    Means we can visit our youngest daughter in Florida more often, she married an American last summer, we fly out again tomorrow. Plus spend time with our other children and grandchildren. Living in North Gower helps as well :-)
    Audiophile Tosher

  4. #94
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

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    Quote Originally Posted by Covenant View Post
    I thought my wife would get bored when she retired from teaching two years ago. Boy was I wrong. She plays badminton three times a week, joined a walking group, goes off to see plays, runs a book club etc. Most of it has been done through the local U3A (University of the third age). Says she has lots of things planned for me when I retire........
    Lol - I bet she has!

    I doubt that Del will get bored either when she retires from teaching, as she'll have loads of interests and hobbies to keep her busy. Some of the planned projects she has for the garden alone will be the equivalent of a full-time job! Plus, we plan on going on lots of holidays abroad to places we've been promising to visit for years....

    I think that's one of the keys to a happy retirement: ensuring that your days are filled with something fun and rewarding

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  5. #95
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

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    Quote Originally Posted by willbewill View Post
    Exactly, that's what it's all about. I also love the fact that we can travel when we want to and take advantage of cheap flights. The only tie we had was our Jack Russell who sadly died quite recently.

    Means we can visit our youngest daughter in Florida more often, she married an American last summer, we fly out again tomorrow. Plus spend time with our other children and grandchildren. Living in North Gower helps as well :-)
    Indeed - and well away from all the 'headless chickens' running around in a pointless rat race!

    Like you say, the key thing is now being in full control of your day, and spending it as YOU wish, which allows you to do the nice things you mention. What price can you put on that?

    I also think that the problem is some couples aren't that close, so there's no advantage in spending time together when retired - hence why they become workaholics instead!

    Sorry about the pooch, btw. That must've been a blow.

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  6. #96
    Join Date: Mar 2014

    Location: West Wales

    Posts: 378
    I'm malcolm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post

    Sorry about the pooch, btw. That must've been a blow.

    Marco.
    Thanks, yes it Knocked me for six, 2018 was a roller coaster of a year in which my mother also passed away.

    It's the first time in over 30 years that we haven't got a dog and over 40 with no pets.
    Audiophile Tosher

  7. #97
    Join Date: Apr 2011

    Location: London

    Posts: 3,563
    I'm Robert.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Cool, and I'm glad it worked out well for you, Will

    I was semi-retired at 45 (and still am), which was possible as I can work from home and still earn enough from my picture framing business, which I'd been running full-time up until then, by cherry-picking profitable/worthwhile jobs, such as hotel contracts, to keep the wolves from the door, but not be burdened by the demands of a full-time job, whilst funds also come in from the properties we rent out, and Del's salary as an English lecturer.

    It means I can do my bit, whilst also having time to look after the house, feed the cats, do all the cleaning and any other jobs required, maintain the garden, help run the forum/answer numerous emails and PMs in the process, and have a nice cup of tea and/or something to eat, ready for Del coming home (to a nice warm, clean house)!

    It's an arrangement that suits both of us, as the bills get paid and we have a decent standard of living, plus still time to enjoy each other's company

    I wouldn't swap that for any amount of extra income, which meant longer working hours and us seeing less of each other, likely increasing our respective stress levels and reducing our overall well-being.

    Marco.
    Enviable position to be in and good on you both because you've set about putting things in place, planted the seeds.

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  8. #98
    Join Date: Feb 2010

    Location: London, UK

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    I'm Dave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sherwood View Post
    Sorry, I would say the Holocaust was pretty effective. Don't confuse talk about eugenics with being anti PC!I can't believe the point needs to be made here! Again
    I don't really want to get into that. By eugenics I intended to mean selective breeding for humans, but of course that can be done in more than one way. The cruel way is to let everyone breed, then cull the ones which don't match the "requirements". Less cruel is to encourage people with talent to breed together, in the hope that the progeny will have even greater talents. Selective breeding under human control does work in both animals and plants, and apparently has been done since well before Roman times. However, my point is that although statistically (that word creeps in again) there is a chance of getting "improvements", there are no guarantees - offspring can seem pretty random - though identical twins are interesting, and may have almost identical lives and characteristics even if they live completely separate lives.

    Re parenting - yes it can make a difference - hopefully a good and big one - but again it's not that easy. There are no "it'll always work" formulae. At some stage in their lives most kids need to rebel, so should parents try to be accommodating and reason, or give the kids something to fight against? Too little control can be damaging, but so can too much control. Sometimes all one can do is hope that "things will turn out right in the end".
    Dave

  9. #99
    Join Date: May 2016

    Location: Notts

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    I'm Geoff.

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    However you try and disguise it, Eugenics is the attempt to legitimise through science the heinous practice of determining who gets to reproduce. If you don't get that you have problems!

    Quote Originally Posted by dave2010 View Post
    I don't really want to get into that. By eugenics I intended to mean selective breeding for humans, but of course that can be done in more than one way. The cruel way is to let everyone breed, then cull the ones which don't match the "requirements". Less cruel is to encourage people with talent to breed together, in the hope that the progeny will have even greater talents. Selective breeding under human control does work in both animals and plants, and apparently has been done since well before Roman times. However, my point is that although statistically (that word creeps in again) there is a chance of getting "improvements", there are no guarantees - offspring can seem pretty random - though identical twins are interesting, and may have almost identical lives and characteristics even if they live completely separate lives.

    Re parenting - yes it can make a difference - hopefully a good and big one - but again it's not that easy. There are no "it'll always work" formulae. At some stage in their lives most kids need to rebel, so should parents try to be accommodating and reason, or give the kids something to fight against? Too little control can be damaging, but so can too much control. Sometimes all one can do is hope that "things will turn out right in the end".

  10. #100
    Join Date: Apr 2012

    Location: Southall, West London

    Posts: 39,376
    I'm Geoff.

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    This thread is heading towards a point where moderation is likely to be needed.
    "when common sense, logic and plausibility are excluded. All that remain are foolishness and lies"

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