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Thread: Grim statistics on retirement age and life expectancy

  1. #11
    Join Date: Mar 2014

    Location: KY - Scotland

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    I'm Mike.

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    Why do you think the government keep raising the retirement age, they don't want you to reach pension age

  2. #12
    Join Date: Feb 2008

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    I'm Neal.

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    Interesting they based their research on Boeing. I worked for BA in the early 80’s and the old boys who I worked with would regularly scan the obituaries of the internal BA Newspaper, amazing the amount of names they knew who had only retired a year or two before...
    Listening in a Foo free Zone...

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  3. #13
    Join Date: May 2016

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    I'm Geoff.

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    At the risk of stating the bleedin' obvious, LEB has increased and continues to do so. We now die slowly from chronic expensive to manage health problems. Furthermore, past investments in retirement have been too low for most people to retire comfortably.

    Don't get me started on these statistics. The conclusions, such as are implied not stated are wrong and for many reasons!

    Quote Originally Posted by mad-moon View Post
    talk about stating the obvious..sheesh...why has the age for retirement increased...The powers that be are not daft...they know fine well that being forced to work well into your 60's is going to have a huge negative impact on the human body, result, it'll kill you. Now they don't have to take care of you..simple.

    I'm just doing what they are doing...stating the bloody obvious...

  4. #14
    Join Date: Oct 2008

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    I'm Jerry.

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    Phased retirement is a practical solution for some. I am 65 in March but the state pension kicks in during September. When you reach your state pension age you dont pay NI saving 12% tax. I will drop down to 4 days a week,then three a year of so later. My job is fairly active so I prefer to keep going for now.
    Jerry
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  5. #15
    Join Date: Feb 2010

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    It's difficult to be sure from that article, as different people are - well, different. The article specifically refers to corporate employees - who seem to be working in the airline industry. It could be that such industries are indeed injurious to health. [though I doubt that there is anything very specific ....]

    I"m hoping the "rules" specified in the article don't apply to me, as I did indeed pass the retirement age for my last employment, and for various reasons stayed on a few months beyond the appointed date in order to process a particular project. Maybe now I'm living on borrowed time - I hope it's not too bad.

    I have known people who retired, and then died fairly shortly afterwards. One in particular died from cancer. It seems unlikely that his work would have caused that, though people commented that if had retired earlier he would perhaps have had at least a few pleasant years before going to glory.

    Sometimes people retire early specifically because they have a medical condition. Some are very lucky, and then survive for a long while afterwards, while others "prove" the actuarial assessment by passing over within a short while, and thus reduce their burden on the pension companies, and in some cases the state.

    I know one person, who despite being seriously ill, seems to prefer paid work and related activity to being idle. He is over 70.
    I know others who have been seriously ill who seem to be enjoying life, and are certainly more active and fitter than I am. On the other hand, I knew one former colleague who was apparently very fit, and went running most days even in his 40s. He was a very fast runner, and could compete even with people 20 years younger. One day he went out for a run, and collapsed on his return. I have outlived him by at least 25 years.

    The article also refers to dying from "stress", which over years has been a somewhat vague and unspecified medical condition. I think it does exist, but is not well specified. It may be physical - but most people nowadays are not doing manual labour. It may be mental. It could also be lifestyle related - perhaps people who feel stressed drink more, eat more, smoke more, do drugs, or don't do enough exercise. Or not ... There are so many possible factors.

    A few things I specifically did not like at work were trying to reconcile impossible constraints. Pressure to "get things done", even though the resources including available time were insufficient. I also did not like conflict, nor the "games" that some people play in order to improve their own "advancement". However, I was probably rather unusual - and I have to confess probably did not fit into a conventional pattern of a "typical" employee.

    I hope that I can continue to enjoy life for a good number of years yet.
    Dave

  6. #16
    Join Date: Feb 2010

    Location: London, UK

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    I'm Dave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sherwood View Post
    At the risk of stating the bleedin' obvious, LEB has increased and continues to do so. We now die slowly from chronic expensive to manage health problems. Furthermore, past investments in retirement have been too low for most people to retire comfortably.
    LEB =?? Life Expectancy ***?? What does the B stand for, or have I got this completely wrong?
    Dave

  7. #17
    Join Date: Apr 2012

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    I'm Geoff.

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    "there are lies, damned lies and statistics"

    I retired early nearly ten years ago and I'm glad I did, although I could possibly do with more productive ways to occupy my time, you get a bit blase' about it all after a while.

    I do think there's an element of truth in the idea that people die earlier the longer they work, I've seen examples. On that basis though, my wife should live forever, she's never done a stroke of decent work in her life .
    "when common sense, logic and plausibility are excluded. All that remain are foolishness and lies"

  8. #18
    Join Date: Apr 2012

    Location: Southall, West London

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    I'm Geoff.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dave2010 View Post
    On the other hand, I knew one former colleague who was apparently very fit, and went running most days even in his 40s. He was a very fast runner, and could compete even with people 20 years younger. One day he went out for a run, and collapsed on his return. I have outlived him by at least 25 years
    I get the impression that there seems to be a trend in people who have been athletes or involved in very heavy manual work dying young or having terrible health problems later in life. The same appears to apply to very tall people as well.
    "when common sense, logic and plausibility are excluded. All that remain are foolishness and lies"

  9. #19
    Join Date: Jan 2008

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    I'm Jerry.

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    Then again, there are lies damn, lies and misquoted articles.

    The article actually says "An actuarial study conducted on some of the larger US Pension Funds including Boeing Aerospace, indicates that employees who retired at the age of 65, died within two years of retirement."

    So it seems to be from data across a range of large US companies, including Boeing, so probably not only aerospace companies.

    Me and the mrs quit work in our mid-40s (good salaries, no kids) and that was over 17 years ago, and we ain't dead yet.
    Jerry

  10. #20
    Join Date: May 2016

    Location: Notts

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    I'm Geoff.

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    Yes. At birth. Each year, statistically, we have a probability of living at least one more year. If you look at a LIFE TABLE which plots these probabilities it is amazing how high the probability of surviving another year, even in your 80s!

    Quote Originally Posted by dave2010 View Post
    LEB =?? Life Expectancy ***?? What does the B stand for, or have I got this completely wrong?

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