+ Reply to Thread
Page 22 of 25 FirstFirst ... 122021222324 ... LastLast
Results 211 to 220 of 247

Thread: Grim statistics on retirement age and life expectancy

  1. #211
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 83,017
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Macca View Post
    We didn't have home economics at my school and I would not be happy if my son was being taught home economics either.
    Why? Clearly it's necessary for some. I can assure you, based on what Del tells me, as she teaches them (academically) everyday, most kids now don't have a clue about home economics, probably because their parents don't either...

    If you want to learn to cook buy a cook book, and budgeting and running a household is just common sense.
    In terms of the last bit, clearly not, in terms of much of the general public, based on the evidence I outlined earlier! Or perhaps common sense is another human skill that's slowly been eroded by our increasing dependency on technology?

    And you can't learn to cook, just by reading cook books!

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  2. #212
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 83,017
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe View Post
    In my case, there was no-one to teach me. My father was paid weekly, in cash. He handed the money to my mother, who put the money behind the clock on the mantlepiece in the dining room, and helped herself to money when she went shopping or paid bills. It was entirely cash-based, so there were no 'books' to keep. Sometimes the money would run out before the week ended, and we'd have to pretend to be out when someone (eg the milkman) wanted paying. My parents didn't have a bank account or cheque books until long after I'd left home, and never had any sort of credit or debit card. I had to teach myself how to budget, which only became a necessity once I'd taken on a mortgage.
    Fair enough. It was rather different for my parents, and me growing up. We were taught home economics in secondary school from 1st year to 3rd year (along with woodwork and metalwork), after which you had to lose certain subjects (such as the above), to study those you wanted to attain formal qualifications in, so I dropped them after that.

    Therefore, during those three years I learned quite a lot about the subjects concerned, including creating a few 'culinary disasters' in the kitchen (read as cookers and stuff they'd put into class rooms)

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  3. #213
    Join Date: May 2009

    Location: Bristol

    Posts: 4,152

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Why? Clearly it's necessary for some. I can assure you, based on what Del tells me, as she teaches them (academically) everyday, most kids now don't have a clue about home economics, probably because their parents don't either...
    It's an old complaint (as most complaints are). Here's something written by Hannah More over two hundred years ago about the two daughters of a wealthy farmer who are sent away to a boarding school:

    'Though they knew how to spend both Pounds, Shillings, and Pence, yet they did not know so well how to cast them up, and they scorned their mother’s request to help with preparations for a dinner party, asking "whether she had sent them to Boarding School to learn how to cook?"

  4. #214
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 83,017
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Len Co View Post
    I must admit I was pleasantly surprised by the quality and (low) prices I found on a recent visit to Lidl. Actually amazed is more the word. I would go there regularly but SWMBO prefers somewhere more expensive and I'm never going to win that arguements!
    Why should there be an argument, and not simply a civilised discussion between two intelligent adults, with supposedly an EQUAL say in the matter?

    Glad you can see the value of Lidl... Their fresh fruit and veg is as good as anything from other supermarkets, and much cheaper, and even their fresh meat/free-range chicken is of superb quality - and if you're partial to a 'ready meal', then their 'Deluxe' range is as good as anything similar from Waitrose, trust me!

    As to why youngsters are poor at the domestic stuff, well there are take-aways every 10 meters, kids delivering pizza 24 x7 in most neighbourhoods, ready meals cheaper in supermarkets than you could buy the ingredients for and armies of people ready to clean your house for a lower hourly rate than yours. I'm not supporting any of this, just saying.
    That bit's a fallacy, but I agree with the rest, and you make a good point about take-away food, which encourages both laziness and overspending. Unfortunately everything is dumbed down these days for convenience, not just food...

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  5. #215
    Join Date: Jul 2009

    Location: Hampshire, UK

    Posts: 2,517
    I'm Buriedunderaloadofturntables.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Indeed, it's a common misconception, as is the notion that it's expensive to eat well....
    So much this.

    I've probably mentioned it before but, in our last house we had an extension added, we were without a kitchen for nearly three months. During this time we obviously went down the pub quite a bit, but also availed ourselves of some decent quality convenience food that could be done in the microwave, as this was all we had available during the week.

    Whilst some of them weren't too bad (although many though 'salt' was a subsitute for 'flavour'), the main thing we noticed was that our shopping bill was 20-30% higher then when we bought all the basics and cooked everything ourselves, as we would normally have done. At that time, we didn't shop at Lidl either, so our shopping billl has now dropped even further.

    Therefore I get very cross indeed when fat, lazy sods appear on TV and whine about how they "can't affored to eat healthy food". Absolute B*ll*cks.
    Adam.

  6. #216
    Join Date: Mar 2014

    Location: West Wales

    Posts: 302
    I'm malcolm.

    Default

    When I was in school, I'm 64, only the girls took home economics and we boys woodwork. But it worked out for me as I was 'asked' to leave school during second year fifth and got a job as an apprentice carpenter and joiner which set the course for my whole career, which was varied but all built upon that start.

    As a kid I helped my mother bake etc and I could do basic meals but during our married life my wife did nearly all the cooking, she was mostly a stay at home mum or as she put it a 'kept woman'. When I retired from my main job I promised myself to learn to cook better and now I also make some of the weekly meals.

    Also I was brought up to be pretty self sufficient and can turn my hand to most things. I always try to repair stuff rather then replacing, another way to save a heap of money. It's a pity car repairs have become so much more complicated nowadays though even though the mechanicals haven't changed greatly

    I learnt book keeping when I had my first bout of self employment encouraged my my father in law who was an accountant
    Audiophile Tosher

  7. #217
    Join Date: Mar 2014

    Location: West Wales

    Posts: 302
    I'm malcolm.

    Default

    Do you think a lot of us guys have learnt to live frugally so we can afford more 'toys' lol
    Audiophile Tosher

  8. #218
    Join Date: Feb 2013

    Location: W Lothian

    Posts: 51,041
    I'm Grant.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Why? Clearly it's necessary for some. I can assure you, based on what Del tells me, as she teaches them (academically) everyday, most kids now don't have a clue about home economics, probably because their parents don't either...



    In terms of the last bit, clearly not, in terms of much of the general public, based on the evidence I outlined earlier! Or perhaps common sense is another human skill that's slowly been eroded by our increasing dependency on technology?

    And you can't learn to cook, just by reading cook books!

    Marco.
    tbh, most kids who left school couldnt cook much, if atall when i was that age; you just learned, usually by asking mother. cook books are an aide to folk who can already do basics right
    Regards,
    Grant ....

    I've said it before and I'll say it again: democracy simply-doesn't-work
    .... ..... ...... ...... ................... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
    OPPO BDP-103D DARBEE - JBE SERIES 3/B&O SP1 - QUAD VENA 2/TWIN PRO MONOBLOCK POWER AMPLIFIERS - AVANTREE OASIS PLUS + LEAF HD BLUETOOTHS - OPPO PM-3 PLANAR +NURAPHONE HEADPHONES - ZBOOK/WIN10 PRO/AUDIRVANA 3 PLUS/TIDAL - SMSL M6 MINIDAC - RPI 3 IQDIGI/VOLUMIO - FULL RANGE TWIN TELEFUNKEN MAIN SPKRS/Q ACOUSTIC BT3 ACTIVES & CANTON SUB - P.INSPIRED MAINS REGENERATED.

    **Men are not punished for their sins, but by them**

  9. #219
    Join Date: Aug 2009

    Location: Staffordshire, England

    Posts: 23,547
    I'm Martin.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Why? Clearly it's necessary for some. I can assure you, based on what Del tells me, as she teaches them (academically) everyday, most kids now don't have a clue about home economics, probably because their parents don't either...



    In terms of the last bit, clearly not, in terms of much of the general public, based on the evidence I outlined earlier! Or perhaps common sense is another human skill that's slowly been eroded by our increasing dependency on technology?

    And you can't learn to cook, just by reading cook books!

    Marco.
    I'm old school, so boys do woodwork/metalwork, girls do home ec. Although there weren't any girls at my school so everyone did woodwork. That was a waste of time as well but at least it's appropriate.

    I agree you can't learn to cook by just reading the book, you read the book then you attempt some of the recipes and practice will make perfect. There's no mysteries that need imparting and you don't need training to work an oven or a grill.

    And you can't teach common sense, it's a learning curve - you do something stupid that results in unpleasant consequences, you learn, you don't do it again. The problem these days is that it's okay, even encouraged, to blame someone else for it (preferably a faceless entity like 'the government') and demand that someone else clears up/pays for the mess you've made. No consequences = no lessons learned.
    Martin



    Current Lash Up:

    Technics SLP1200 CD Player * Nelson Pass DCB1 Pre amp / Krell KSA50S Power amp * JM Lab Electra 926 loudspeakers *


    'You fool! To think that your ape-brain could contain the full knowledge of the Krell!'

  10. #220
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 83,017
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Macca View Post
    I'm old school, so boys do woodwork/metalwork, girls do home ec. Although there weren't any girls at my school so everyone did woodwork. That was a waste of time as well but at least it's appropriate.
    I'm not any 'school', old or new; it was simply how it was in my school when I was there. For a period of time, we did both home economics and woodwork/metalwork. No girls at your school? Whoa.. Then you missed out on a whole load of fun, bro!!

    I agree you can't learn to cook by just reading the book, you read the book then you attempt some of the recipes and practice will make perfect. There's no mysteries that need imparting and you don't need training to work an oven or a grill.
    No, but it takes knowledge and experience to know how to successfully combine different flavours and ingredients [i.e. proper cooking], and which involves rather more skill than simply knowing how to switch on a cooker!

    And you can't teach common sense, it's a learning curve - you do something stupid that results in unpleasant consequences, you learn, you don't do it again. The problem these days is that it's okay, even encouraged, to blame someone else for it (preferably a faceless entity like 'the government') and demand that someone else clears up/pays for the mess you've made. No consequences = no lessons learned.
    Absolutely, but the problem is also we're relying more and more on computers to do our thinking for us, as evidenced everywhere, so how can you learn common sense when you're using your brain, and most significantly, your own instincts and judgement, less and less?

    That's one of the reasons why we're slowly breeding a notion of 'zombies'!

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

+ Reply to Thread
Page 22 of 25 FirstFirst ... 122021222324 ... LastLast



 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •