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Thread: What a twat I am !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  1. #61
    Join Date: Oct 2015

    Location: Pulborough, West Sussex, UK

    Posts: 890
    I'm Ian.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TazSob View Post
    Hi Marco,

    That's put a smile on my face knowing you love the authentic curry and know the difference between the restaurant curries and home cooked ones.

    I'll be putting up 2 recipes, one for a kidney bean curry and one for a chicken/lamb curry that can be with boned or boneless meat. Just need to find some time to write them down and go over them to make sure I've made them easy to follow and got all bases covered.

    Regards
    Taz
    Really looking forward to it Taz. I used to do deliveries for an Indian takeaway years ago and always ate with the staff at the end of the night, amazing food with the bones in. I shall be stocking up on herbs and spices in anticipation
    My stuff; Toshiba SR-370/Mission 774 /Ortofon Quintet Black, Cambridge CXC CD transport/Musical Fidelity X DAC/Musical Fidelity X10v3 tube buffer, Musical Fidelity A3, Nakamichi CA-5E pre amp, Acoustic Solutions FM/DAB tuner, Mordaunt Short Signifer, Klotz MC5000/MS audio, NVA LS5

  2. #62
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 79,480
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

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    The fact is, the *only* way to experience what the cuisine of a particular country tastes like is to sample an authentic version of it. I've always hated how, in the UK, restaurants serving foreign food, tailor it (tone it down, usually in terms of heat/spice and flavour) for the British palate.

    That's not what it should be about!

    It should be about introducing your cuisine, as it's meant to be eaten in its authentic state, to whoever comes to your restaurant, and they either like it or they don't! If it's quality stuff and cooked with passion and skill, the results will speak for themselves.

    In my experience, if you stick to your roots, by being as authentic as possible, and educate Brits to appreciate your cuisine, then the more adventurous and discerning ones will love what you're doing, and come in their droves. Then, you'll not only be pleasing your [discerning] diners, but also the chef (if he or she is worthy of the name), by giving them something exciting to prepare and serve, rather than the same old crap...

    Sadly though, most Indian, Chinese, and even Italian restaurants here tend to take the 'easy option' of serving up the usual drab formulaic dross, which is copied by every other 'Tom, Dick and Harry', of the same type, so when you go into one of these places, you can pretty much predict what the menu will be, even before you look at it

    There is simply no originality or desire to be DIFFERENT. Too many such restaurants simply fall into the comfort zone of providing what the masses expect, rather than what should be served to them, by staying true to your roots!

    Anyway, sorry for the rant, but it's a major bugbear of mine

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  3. #63
    Join Date: Jul 2014

    Location: Shropshire

    Posts: 2,021
    I'm Anto.

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    I chop chicken on a glass chopping board or plate . Use a fork to hold chicken ,sharpest knife ever and grit the teeth together when the squeaking /shrieking of knife on glass occurs.
    Mind you ,I am a twat too
    I only ride 'em, I don't know what makes 'em work

  4. #64
    Join Date: Feb 2013

    Location: W Lothian

    Posts: 46,102
    I'm Grant.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oddball View Post
    I chop chicken on a glass chopping board or plate . Use a fork to hold chicken ,sharpest knife ever and grit the teeth together when the squeaking /shrieking of knife on glass occurs.
    Mind you ,I am a twat too
    sure the chicken's shrieking doesn't help either Anto
    Regards,
    Grant ....

    I've said it before and I'll say it again: democracy simply-doesn't-work
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  5. #65
    Join Date: Jan 2009

    Location: Essex

    Posts: 18,182
    I'm openingabottleofwine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    The fact is, the *only* way to experience what the cuisine of a particular country tastes like is to sample an authentic version of it. I've always hated how, in the UK, restaurants serving foreign food, tailor it (tone it down, usually in terms of heat/spice and flavour) for the British palate.

    That's not what it should be about!

    It should be about introducing your cuisine, as it's meant to be eaten in its authentic state, to whoever comes to your restaurant, and they either like it or they don't! If it's quality stuff and cooked with passion and skill, the results will speak for themselves.

    In my experience, if you stick to your roots, by being as authentic as possible, and educate Brits to appreciate your cuisine, then the more adventurous and discerning ones will love what you're doing, and come in their droves. Then, you'll not only be pleasing your [discerning] diners, but also the chef (if he or she is worthy of the name), by giving them something exciting to prepare and serve, rather than the same old crap...

    Sadly though, most Indian, Chinese, and even Italian restaurants here tend to take the 'easy option' of serving up the usual drab formulaic dross, which is copied by every other 'Tom, Dick and Harry', of the same type, so when you go into one of these places, you can pretty much predict what the menu will be, even before you look at it

    There is simply no originality or desire to be DIFFERENT. Too many such restaurants simply fall into the comfort zone of providing what the masses expect, rather than what should be served to them, by staying true to your roots!

    Anyway, sorry for the rant, but it's a major bugbear of mine

    Marco.
    I would also say that that the traditional food served in China, or in India, is highly regional and NOTHING like the stuff served up in the average Chinese or Indian restaurant in the UK. To get close one has to find a restaurant where the Chinese themselves eat - they exist in London's "Chinatown", but you would probably walk past them un-noticed because they often have oil-cloth table covers and are lit with unwelcoming fluorescent lights of the lowest wattage possible. The food though is superb!
    Have you listened to this month's choice in the Album Club?

    Barry

  6. #66
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 79,480
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

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    indeed, Barry - and we eat at such places regularly, in the Chinatown in Liverpool (the oldest in the UK) or 'curry mile'/Rusholme in Manchester, although one now has to be rather selective with the latter, as it's quite hard to find authentic Indian food, among all the bog-standard dross...

    We have a golden rule; if when we enter an Asian restaurant, 95% of the diners aren't either Chinese or Indian/Pakistani, we walk out and go somewhere else!

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  7. #67
    Join Date: Jan 2009

    Location: Essex

    Posts: 18,182
    I'm openingabottleofwine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    indeed, Barry - and we eat at such places regularly, in the Chinatown in Liverpool (the oldest in the UK) or 'curry mile' in Manchester, although one now has to be rather selective with the latter, as it's quite hard to find authentic Indian food, among all the bog-standard dross...

    We have a golden rule; if when we enter an Asian restaurant, 95% of the diners aren't either Chinese or Indian/Pakistani, we walk out and go somewhere else!

    Marco.
    The vast majority of "Indian" restaurants in the UK are run by Bangladeshis, similarly most of the "Japanese" restaurants are Korean.

    One of the best Chinese restaurants I have visited was in Bristol, and one of the best Indian restaurant was in Leicester.
    Have you listened to this month's choice in the Album Club?

    Barry

  8. #68
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 79,480
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Barry View Post
    The vast majority of "Indian" restaurants in the UK are run by Bangladeshis, similarly most of the "Japanese" restaurants are Korean.
    Yeah, simply because it sounds 'posher' and more acceptable that way to your average British diner [to call them Indian and Japanese restaurants respectively, even though, technically, they're not]. It's bollocks, and such ignorance/snobbery pisses me off.

    One of the best Chinese restaurants I have visited was in Bristol, and one of the best Indian restaurant was in Leicester.
    Nice one. The best 'foreign food' you'll always eat is where there is a large local community of people from its country of origin. Therefore, I wouldn't be surprised if there was a large Chinese community where you ate in Bristol, and vice versa with Bangladeshis and 'Indian' food, in Leicester...

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

    BE HAPPY EVERYDAY!

  9. #69
    Join Date: May 2012

    Location: Dagenham Essex

    Posts: 8,053
    I'm I'mteachingmarcotheartofpishanto.

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    Hello , its me the original poster

    The binding post plate has arrived and very nice it is as well , also quite heavy

    Looks like its time to fire up the soldering iron
    Music , fills the gaps between silence !

    TAT Sale post Leader " Marcos Mentor "

    Also a pishanto specialist confirmed by Head Daftee

    Real name " Allen " or "Zoomer Nut”, “Numpty Napper”.

    ±± KEEP IT REEL

  10. #70
    Join Date: May 2012

    Location: Dagenham Essex

    Posts: 8,053
    I'm I'mteachingmarcotheartofpishanto.

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    IMG_0412 by Allen Wells, on Flickr
    .
    .IMG_0413 by Allen Wells, on Flickr
    .
    .IMG_0414 by Allen Wells, on Flickr
    .
    .
    Music , fills the gaps between silence !

    TAT Sale post Leader " Marcos Mentor "

    Also a pishanto specialist confirmed by Head Daftee

    Real name " Allen " or "Zoomer Nut”, “Numpty Napper”.

    ±± KEEP IT REEL

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