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Thread: Solid vs stranded conductor interconnects?

  1. #11
    Join Date: Aug 2008

    Location: Suffolk, UK

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    I'm Paul.

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    I think that generally solid core coax can have lower capacitance, or rather that it is easier to design for lower capacitance. Also as you only have a single large strand you do not have to worry about controlling the regularity of the positions of the separate strands and the air gaps that can exist between them - the properties of the cable can be more regular section to section. Whether any of that makes a difference in an IC at the end of the day, who knows.
    ~Paul~

  2. #12
    Join Date: Oct 2016

    Location: Hampshire

    Posts: 211
    I'm Mel.

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    I have used Chord Solid cables for years and always liked them.

    They were used throughout my systems to connect all units but now I have moved over to single box systems based on Naim Uniti streamers so only one system has need of a (valve) phono and that is still connected by the solid interconnect.

    Pity you are already sorted else I would have let you have a pair of my surplus ones for 20 plus postage.

    Mel

  3. #13
    Join Date: May 2016

    Location: Notts

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    I'm Geoff.

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    The DNM cable I referred to wasn't coaxial. It was a flat ribbon cable with very thin solid core single wiring. No problems with RF interference for the short run I had.

    Geoff

  4. #14
    Join Date: May 2012

    Location: Toulouse

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    I'm GettingFunky.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cycleallday View Post
    I have used Chord Solid cables for years and always liked them.

    They were used throughout my systems to connect all units but now I have moved over to single box systems based on Naim Uniti streamers so only one system has need of a (valve) phono and that is still connected by the solid interconnect.

    Pity you are already sorted else I would have let you have a pair of my surplus ones for 20 plus postage.

    Mel
    A kind offer, thanks.
    Contemplating life, the universe and use of HiFi forums.

    Life is too short to worry about the opinion of others.

  5. #15
    Join Date: Apr 2009

    Location: Melbourne

    Posts: 155
    I'm Alex.

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    I prefer solid core (thin diameter) for IC. Copper is good, but I am now using pure silver solid core wire and have found them to be excellent. Stranded wire interconnects tend to sound a bit "forced" in the treble for me, especially some that use silver plated copper stranded wire. In my opinion,Teflon insulation as die electric works wonders in opening up the sound while plastic sheaths and insulation congest the sound

  6. #16
    Join Date: Apr 2016

    Location: Bishops Stortford

    Posts: 618
    I'm Chris.

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    Quote Originally Posted by maxrob200 View Post
    I prefer solid core (thin diameter) for IC. Copper is good, but I am now using pure silver solid core wire and have found them to be excellent. Stranded wire interconnects tend to sound a bit "forced" in the treble for me, especially some that use silver plated copper stranded wire. In my opinion,Teflon insulation as die electric works wonders in opening up the sound while plastic sheaths and insulation congest the sound
    Perhaps straying off topic a bit, but here is an article you may find interesting

    http://sw1xad.co.uk/sound-of-copper-...er-conductors/
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  7. #17
    Join Date: Apr 2009

    Location: Melbourne

    Posts: 155
    I'm Alex.

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    Good link... one or the other (copper or silver) preferred over plating by those guys.

  8. #18
    Join Date: Apr 2016

    Location: souf east for work

    Posts: 988
    I'm paul.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bigman80 View Post
    I have a OCC copper cable about to do the rounds if you want to try it.
    Do you mean ofc as in oxygen free copper Oliver?
    I bought some speaker cable supposedly oxygen free copper and noticed when stripping it, it was magnetic, I contacted the seller to tell him it wasn't solid copper but plated. Didn't matter to me and was cheap so not bothered but not as described for other buyers.
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  9. #19
    Join Date: Nov 2015

    Location: Wolverhampton

    Posts: 6,263
    I'm Oliver.

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    Quote Originally Posted by paulf-2007 View Post
    Do you mean ofc as in oxygen free copper Oliver?
    I bought some speaker cable supposedly oxygen free copper and noticed when stripping it, it was magnetic, I contacted the seller to tell him it wasn't solid copper but plated. Didn't matter to me and was cheap so not bothered but not as described for other buyers.
    Nope,



    Used throughout the high end audio industry in most flagship cable products, occ provides the superior quality copper and silver possible today.

    OCC (Ohno Continuous Cast) is the name given to the casting process developed to help defeat annealing issues and virtually eliminate all grain boundaries in copper or silver with a unique patented process. The OCC casting method uses specialized heated moulds in order to draw a single crystal up to 125 meters in length. With only a single crystal in very long lengths, there is an unimpeded free path for the best possible signal transfer. Along with this superior single long crystal structure, OCC provides copper and silver with the least possible oxides and other impurities.*

    In high contrast to OCC, there are other lower grade coppers such as OFC with a multitude of grain boundaries and other impurities. OFC (Oxygen Free Copper) has around 400 crystals per foot and despite its name has an oxygen content of about 10ppm. Having less oxygen content and less overall impurities compared OFC. OFC has a plethora of grain boundaries per foot that the signal must route around and pass.

    The question ultimately comes down to the following: Would you rather have your signal flow in a path with many cracks, bumps and obstacles in the way (OFC) or flow along a completely unimpeded free path with the lowest possible impurities (OCC). From our view the choice is simple, and the bottom line is most top cable designs utilize OCC as it gives the absolute purest base platform to get that much closer to true absolute transparency.

    Copied and pasted from a website.
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