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Thread: Help with classical music

  1. #1
    Join Date: Oct 2014

    Location: Lincolnshire

    Posts: 278
    I'm Graham.

    Default Help with classical music

    Right, this is not going to be easy as tastes vary greatly - but could someone point me towards some classical music to try Now, like most I have Vivaldi the four seasons, holst the planets and I think its handels water music all of which I can listen too easily.....also never new where to look for I think its called Adagio for strings and organ - I heard it played in the film Galipoli

    So some recommendations to get me started please.......
    "An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools" Ernest Hemingway

    Set-Up (So Far) Garrard 401 with Rega 300 arm & Black 2M, Longdog Audio twin valve dual input phono, Denon DVD 2500 Transport all through Creek Destiny Mk1 integrated amp into Rega RS3 Floor standers

  2. #2
    Join Date: Apr 2013

    Location: Granes - Haut Vallee de l'aude - EU

    Posts: 2,833
    I'm Richard.

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    Wow. What a huge topic. I got started a bit because my dad had a bit of an interest, but at University I used to go and watch Sir Simon Rattle conducting. I started with TV adverts

    Hovis - Dvorak 9th "New World Symphony"
    Hamlet cigars - a Jacques Loussier Trio jazz version of Bachs "Air" from the Orchestral Suite (which JL called "Air on a G string" - it is in the key of G)
    British Airways - Lakme flower duet
    Old Spice - Carmina Burana by Karl Orff
    etc

    If you fancy a bit of Opera - try Carmen first
    Greig Peer Gynt is good recognisable popular stuff
    ditto Tchaikovsky 1812 Overture
    ditto Beethovens 5th - although to be a bit less cheesy how about the 3rd, 6th or 7th?

    The Galipoli (Mel Gibson) music is the Adagio in G Minor by Albinoni. You could try the Neville Mariner version (Acadamy of St Martin in the Fields)

    http://www.discogs.com/Academy-Of-St...elease/5789376

    That do you to get started?

  3. #3
    Join Date: Oct 2014

    Location: Lincolnshire

    Posts: 278
    I'm Graham.

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    Cheers Richard, I'll give 'em a go tonight I did have a La Boheme box set somewhere??
    "An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools" Ernest Hemingway

    Set-Up (So Far) Garrard 401 with Rega 300 arm & Black 2M, Longdog Audio twin valve dual input phono, Denon DVD 2500 Transport all through Creek Destiny Mk1 integrated amp into Rega RS3 Floor standers

  4. #4
    Join Date: Mar 2008

    Location: Halifax, UK

    Posts: 1,411
    I'm Nick.

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    The simple way (works for me) is to listen to Radio 3 for a week whenever you can and note down what you like.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adagio_for_Strings
    Nick.

  5. #5
    Join Date: Apr 2012

    Location: United Kingdom

    Posts: 2,085
    I'm Richard.

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    I would suggest you look at the type of music you already like. By that I mean the style, or emotion. For example I rather like spacey and trippy music of all types, also "chamber" music, as in small bands or acoustic music. So for me it's people like Bach, William Byrd, Arvo Part, Philip Glass, Thomas Tallis. Or Mozart's chamber music, which also appeals to my liking for melody. Not fond of most of the "classical" period, from Beethoven onwards, until you get to Ravel, Debussy, Satie, etc. Don't like big music generally, whether classical or rock. Apart from Respighi, for some strange reason!
    So my classical and popular music tastes coincide. And it depends what you call classical, anyway. So why not have a look at early and baroque music?

  6. #6
    Join Date: Apr 2013

    Location: Granes - Haut Vallee de l'aude - EU

    Posts: 2,833
    I'm Richard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom-Brown View Post
    Cheers Richard, I'll give 'em a go tonight I did have a La Boheme box set somewhere??
    La Boheme is probably not where I would start with Opera. Particularly not just to listen to. It doesn't have any foot-tapping songs to it. I saw a fabulous version recently at the Royal Albert Hall, which was proper over-the-top theatre, and I love Puccini, but its a lot of recitative,and not too many boppy tunes. Mind you if Mimi needs her frozen tiny hands warming, I'm your man. ( I can say that as the Missus sang Mimi at Trinity...)

    Carmen is a lot more accessible. I saw one production near Maidstone in a big top with horses! Loads a tunes!

  7. #7
    Join Date: Oct 2014

    Location: Lincolnshire

    Posts: 278
    I'm Graham.

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    Cheers guy's, lots of sound advice....I've found a play list on spotify with loads to listen to..found it by entering some of the above suggestions I think that's my main problem the actual title of the piece - its blooming greek to me
    "An intelligent man is sometimes forced to be drunk to spend time with his fools" Ernest Hemingway

    Set-Up (So Far) Garrard 401 with Rega 300 arm & Black 2M, Longdog Audio twin valve dual input phono, Denon DVD 2500 Transport all through Creek Destiny Mk1 integrated amp into Rega RS3 Floor standers

  8. #8
    Join Date: Aug 2010

    Location: East Midlands

    Posts: 386
    I'm Hugh.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldpinkman View Post
    La Boheme is probably not where I would start with Opera. Particularly not just to listen to. It doesn't have any foot-tapping songs to it. I saw a fabulous version recently at the Royal Albert Hall, which was proper over-the-top theatre, and I love Puccini, but its a lot of recitative,and not too many boppy tunes. Mind you if Mimi needs her frozen tiny hands warming, I'm your man. ( I can say that as the Missus sang Mimi at Trinity...)

    Carmen is a lot more accessible. I saw one production near Maidstone in a big top with horses! Loads a tunes!
    "Foot-tapping songs"? "Boppy tunes"?

    If that's what you're looking for in Opera, or Classical music in general, I wouldn't bother if I were you. Stick to the simpler stuff.

  9. #9
    Join Date: Jun 2015

    Location: London/Durham

    Posts: 2,920
    I'm Lawrence.

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    Quote Originally Posted by awkwardbydesign View Post
    I would suggest you look at the type of music you already like. By that I mean the style, or emotion. For example I rather like spacey and trippy music of all types, also "chamber" music, as in small bands or acoustic music. So for me it's people like Bach, William Byrd, Arvo Part, Philip Glass, Thomas Tallis. Or Mozart's chamber music, which also appeals to my liking for melody. Not fond of most of the "classical" period, from Beethoven onwards, until you get to Ravel, Debussy, Satie, etc. Don't like big music generally, whether classical or rock. Apart from Respighi, for some strange reason!
    So my classical and popular music tastes coincide. And it depends what you call classical, anyway. So why not have a look at early and baroque music?
    +1

    Baroque and early music got me into classical when I was at school. Used to listen to radio 3 and when a baroque composer came up as composer of the week I tried to tape all the works.

    As an easy entry I would say try chamber music by Mozart and JC Bach, CF Abel and other 'Galante' composers, and make sure they are period instrument / authentic ensembles as they bring a much lighter touch to the music and the tone of the baroque oboe in particular but all other instruments are so much more beautiful than the modern equivalents.


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