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337alant
08-11-2017, 15:34
Could anyone advise on good Audio / Video editing software
I would like to edit or insert additional Audio into Videos :scratch:

Alan

struth
08-11-2017, 16:03
there are some in ipad. splice and a new one quik. ..not used any on win 10 yet

struth
08-11-2017, 16:15
quik is not that type. sorry just tried it.. quite fun tho:D splice im sure you can add music..

337alant
08-11-2017, 16:41
Thanks Grant, sorry I forgot to mention I don't have any Apple hardware, software only Win 10/ PC

Alan

dave2010
23-12-2018, 08:39
For Apple (which our OP doesn't have) Final Cut Pro X is pretty good, and there's always iMovie which is much cheaper - though not as powerful.

For Windows and Apple there's Adobe Premiere - which can sometimes be had cheaply in bundles. Also if it's only for a one off job, you can use an Adobe CC subscription for a very short period, which keeps the cost down, though the problem with that would be learning how to do what you want in a short period (say a month) otherwise the costs will go up.

There are some free ones. Some of the free ones are pretty bad - though might be useful occasionally for formats such as AVI. I think I had one video to process which I could only do with such piece of software.

This link has some reasonable recommendations - https://www.oberlo.co.uk/blog/best-free-video-editing-software

Blender is very good, but difficult to use at first. It's really aimed at 3D modelling.

DaVinci Resolve is also very good - and has some useful tools for handling colour.

Lightworks is also good - and has been used to make feature films. Again a bit complicated, though
the editing model is quite easy to understand. I think one problem is actually producing a finished product - certainly if it's to be used for any commercial application. There may be something to pay once the video has been put together, though it's probably not a big deal for home videos - but worth checking that out.

I would avoid most of the other tools in that blog post - I haven't had good experiences with some of them.

It is still possible to use QuickTime on most Apple kit, though it's not too powerful. It's quite useful for some cheap and cheerful jobs. For a while it was available on Windows, but it's not any more.

You might also find Handbrake - which is a compression tool - very useful as sometimes it's necessary to change formats of video and audio files - (yes - even from mp4 to mp4) - in order to import the files into some of the NLE (Non Linear Editor) tools. See https://handbrake.fr/

There is a similar tool called Compressor from Apple, which is quite good for batch processing, but it costs a modest sum, and for many jobs Handbrake does at least as good a job.

For audio Audacity is good, and it's possible to use that to edit the audio, then insert it into a video using some of the other tools. However, getting precise synchronisation can be tricky (even with video tools). One particular problem is that most video works on frames at 24, 25 or 30 fps, and that represents about 30 milliseconds of audio. Slipping audio by one frame forwards or back can just about work, but really one does need to have better control over the audio, so a tool which allows the audio tracks to be shifted by small amounts (say 1 ms or less) is much better. Learning how to synchronise tracks is pretty much an essential skill - and if the video source material hasn't already been produced, then it helps to use techniques such as clapping (or use a clapperboard) to get definite control over the audio. It is possible to use trial and error afterwards, but much simpler if tracks are synchronised at the recording stage, or if there is a clap or some other audible signal (drop a glass!). Always record audio with video, even if the audio is to be stripped off or replaced with higher quality versions, as it makes synchronisation and editing easier.

If you're not familar with editing tools, some (perhaps most) of the better ones are quite tricky to learn - and they are different in their approaches. The best simple ones are iMovie and Quicktime, and perhaps also Premiere (which is also more powerful). Many of the other cheap and simple ones are likely to give one grief - IMO.

If you're totally new to video editing there are loads of YouTube video tutorials, and it helps to watch as many as you can.

Does that help?

Edward
23-12-2018, 09:42
This seems to be an old thread being resurrected. :eyebrows:

Anyway, in case the OP is still reading, give the 'video projects' section within the Microsoft 'Photos' app that is now bundled with Windows 10 a go. Some basic tools included which achieves simple video projects including adding audio to video.

dave2010
23-12-2018, 12:27
This seems to be an old thread being resurrected. :eyebrows:

Anyway, in case the OP is still reading, give the 'video projects' section within the Microsoft 'Photos' app that is now bundled with Windows 10 a go. Some basic tools included which achieves simple video projects including adding audio to video.Sorry - I must have done that in error! I thought it was a recent post to which I responded. Too early in the morning for me to get everything right!

Of course in days gone by MS had its own Movie maker, which was basic but usable. I think there's a version for Win 10.

I'll go back to sleep now!

struth
23-12-2018, 12:30
Sorry - I must have done that in error! I thought it was a recent post to which I responded. Too early in the morning for me to get everything right!

Of course in days gone by MS had its own Movie maker, which was basic but usable. I think there's a version for Win 10.

I'll go back to sleep now!

it was an excellent post:)

Edward
23-12-2018, 12:59
Yes indeed an excellent post with lots of useful information. Sorry I should have said. [emoji41]

I still have Movie Maker on my system and good for quick things. Some company bought the rights and code for it and have made a right old mess of it and charge silly money.