PDA

View Full Version : "the beatles' entire catalogue remastered for release 09-09-09"



Audiocom AV
11-04-2009, 21:46
Hello All

Just when you thought you'd bought your very last Beatles album, and I quote; "The albums have been re-mastered by a dedicated team of engineers at EMI's Abbey Road Studios in London over a four year period utilising state of the art recording technology alongside vintage studio equipment, carefully maintaining the authenticity and integrity of the original analogue recordings. The result of this painstaking process is the highest fidelity the catalogue has seen since its original release."

Full article available here;
http://www.beatles.com/core/news/

Mark /Audiocom

The Grand Wazoo
11-04-2009, 22:16
i

The Grand Wazoo
11-04-2009, 22:17
That's got to be one of the most repeated lies in the history of recorded music.


I'll reserve my judgement - let's see how the recordings, that have earned their living more times over than almost any others ever made, are priced.

DSJR
13-04-2009, 16:15
According to Amazon UK, they're mid priced at around nine quid or so.

I wonder what they've done to them? The first four sounded bright cos apparently, that's the way the masters sound when not warmed up by the vinyl reproductive process..

I also hope they haven't been heavy handed with the "No Noise," as some of EMI's engineers were prone to be with disastrous results for reverb and instrumental decay..

DSJR
13-04-2009, 16:35
Hope I'm allowed to post the following from -

http://blogcritics.org/archives/2009/04/08/121952.php

"...Re-mastering the Beatles catalogue

The re-mastering process commenced with an extensive period conducting tests before finally copying the analogue master tapes into the digital medium. When this was completed, the transfer was achieved using a Pro Tools workstation operating at 24 bit 192 kHz resolution via a Prism A-D converter. Transferring was a lengthy procedure done a track at a time. Although EMI tape does not suffer the oxide loss associated with some later analogue tapes, there was nevertheless a slight build up of dust, which was removed from the tape machine heads between each title.

From the onset, considerable thought was given to what audio restorative processes were going to be allowed. It was agreed that electrical clicks, microphone vocal pops, excessive sibilance and bad edits should be improved where possible, so long as it didn't impact on the original integrity of the songs.

In addition, de-noising technology, which is often associated with re-mastering, was to be used, but subtly and sparingly. Eventually, less than five of the 525 minutes of Beatles music was subjected to this process. Finally, as is common with today's music, overall limiting - to increase the volume level of the CD - has been used, but on the stereo versions only. However, it was unanimously agreed that because of the importance of The Beatles' music, limiting would be used moderately, so as to retain the original dynamics of the recordings.

When all of the albums had been transferred, each song was then listened to several times to locate any of the agreed imperfections. These were then addressed by Guy Massey, working with Audio Restoration engineer Simon Gibson.

Mastering could now take place, once the earliest vinyl pressings, along with the existing CDs, were loaded into Pro Tools, thus allowing comparisons to be made with the original master tapes during the equalization process. When an album had been completed, it was auditioned the next day in studio three - a room familiar to the engineers, as all of the recent Beatles mixing projects had taken place in there - and any further alteration of EQ could be addressed back in the mastering room. Following the initial satisfaction of Guy and Steve, Allan Rouse and Mike Heatley then checked each new re-master in yet another location and offered any further suggestions. This continued until all 13 albums were completed to the team's satisfaction.

You know, remastered."

Beechwoods
13-04-2009, 16:46
Interesting. To be honest I wish I enjoyed The Beatles' music more, so I could appreciate the result.

When I first read this, I was surprised that the mixdown masters were still usable. Roger McGuinn decided to go back to the multi-tracks and remix to new mixdown masters when it was decided to remaster The Byrds back catalog. This was necessary because the original mixdown masters were too rough to use, having been played repeatedly over the years for prior CD mastering, and - gasp - because the original mixdown masters had been used repeatedly to create various pressing masters, often when overseas territories decided a local release was in order... I think the same was done with The Who's back catalogue. Perhaps The Beatles' masters have been treated with more care over the years.

Why was 'limiting' considered necessary. And why don't they just give everyone a 'compress' button on their CDP so the masters don't need to be. All that effort and then that.

Interesting to see they used the vinyl releases as a reference. I wonder if they checked out Dr Ebbett's transfers or bought their own originals. And we should be told which TT, arm and cartridge they used, lest there has been any undesirable colouration of the result ;)

Audiocom AV
13-04-2009, 18:56
I wonder if they checked out Dr Ebbett's transfers or bought their own originals. And we should be told which TT, arm and cartridge they used, lest there has been any undesirable colouration of the result ;)

Hi Beechwoods

I first listened to the Dr Ebbett's transfer to WAV via a Squeezebox Transporter and external DAC and I heard some of the best Beatles playback I have encountered. Even the first 4 albums were highly listenable!

We will have to wait and hear the result and I will be comparing the CD's to Mobile Fidelity and the Japan First Pressings.

Best, Mark

Marco
13-04-2009, 19:01
Guys,

For Beatles stuff it has to be vinyl. I have a few original albums in mono and also some later remastered audiophile grade stuff - all sound superb and much better than anything on CD :)

Marco.

Spectral Morn
13-04-2009, 20:30
Does Michael Jackson still own the rights to this material ? Call me suspicious but if he does this would earn him a few more dollars he needs badly. Frankly and honestly, along with the Stones I think the Beatles are overrated :sofa:

Does the world really need this stuff done again ? Frankly I think not....how many rehashes of a rehash can EMI get away with. The job should have been done right before. I am sick of record companies fleecing music fans...its a disgrace.


Regards D S D L

DSJR
13-04-2009, 22:50
Guys,

For Beatles stuff it has to be vinyl. I have a few original albums in mono and also some later remastered audiophile grade stuff - all sound superb and much better than anything on CD :)

Marco.

I disagree with you on the mid period multi-everything stuff. Vinyl just can't cope..

The first four album releases on CD were what seem to be straight transfers with no mucking about. OK you say until you hear the middy, bright balance from these. George Martin said at the time that what you get was what was there and there'd have been an outcry if they'd changed anything. The fact the B&W had given EMI and Polygram quantites of 801's to master with also plays a part. Most bright toned CD's sound fine on 801's I found...

The mid period albums were much better treated I felt. Rubber Soul was and still a superb CD, funny stereo and all. Revolver was a very complex album to master for CD and apart from a touch of edit sorting, not much could be done.

I knew that the multi-tracks for Sgt Pepper still existed, as George Martin showed on TV how each of the four tracks was put together and blended to make the whole. The band themselves used limiting at this time in the recording process I understand. My several LP copies of this album all suffer with the treble dulling towards side end, the CD sounding all but identical at the beginning of the sides, despite being transferred from a safety copy I'm told, as the original stereo master was shagged.

I can't speak for the later albums as I didn't much care for them, unlike people nearer the Beatles' age...

I had a job on the road when "1" came out and was amused to see an LP of this in an Audio T store. The fact that this LP was cut from digital masters almost certainly going right over the opinionated manager's head it seemed at the time. If only he knew that most reps give detailed reports on their dealer visits back to their managers.....

Wendy Carlos (formerly Walter) wrote a splendid piece concerning the mastering ten years or so ago of her back catalogue (Switched On Bach etc) once her thirty year contract with CBS expired. Althopugh the courier presented her with a box full of tapes, she still had the 8 track mix-down masters for each of the albums, which were compiled together to make the production masters that CBS used in the LP, tape and original CD transfers. Skipping a generation of tape and not having to bother with eq'ing the mid up and compressing to stop needle-jumping has transformed the music apparently (I can't afford the box-set).

The Grand Wazoo
13-04-2009, 23:17
It always seems to be(speaking breathlessly):
"I've got this great new piece of studio wizardry, with more settings than the last one I showed you, it's great fun to play with and it makes stuff sound a bit different. And different has got to be better, cos we didn't have the ability to do that then & we do now. So we should use it on EVERYTHING.
......cos it's great.............and new..............and we didn't have it before................
By the way did I say it was great?....................and new?"

A very wise man once said: "If the only tool you have is a hammer, all your problems begin to look like nails".

This wise man over here says: "If you have a new hammer - you want to hit everything with it to see if it will behave like a nail".

The answer isn't the latest studio gizmo. The answer is mounted on either side of every engineer & producers head. A pair of ears. Unless you can make something truly better.........not just different, then leave it alone.

Spectral Morn
13-04-2009, 23:29
It always seems to be(speaking breathlessly):
"I've got this great new piece of studio wizardry, with more settings than the last one I showed you, it's great fun to play with and it makes stuff sound a bit different. And different has got to be better, cos we didn't have the ability to do that then & we do now. So we should use it on EVERYTHING.
......cos it's great.............and new..............and we didn't have it before................
By the way did I say it was great?....................and new?"

A very wise man once said: "If the only tool you have is a hammer, all your problems begin to look like nails".

This wise man over here says: "If you have a new hammer - you want to hit everything with it to see if it will behave like a nail".

The answer isn't the latest studio gizmo. The answer is mounted on either side of every engineer & producers head. A pair of ears. Unless you can make something truly better.........not just different, then leave it alone.

And the people said AMEN.


Regards D S D L

Marco
14-04-2009, 06:52
I have to agree with Chris.

Music aside (and I love ALL Beatles material), I find the recording quality of originals very good indeed, even with its inherent 'character' - which is essential I feel for one to get a 'sense' of the occasion and/or venue.

One has to be careful that in the pursuit of 'ultimate' audio standards the very qualities which make performances special aren't stripped away and music loses its 'soul' - it's not all about 'sound'! :)

Marco.

The Grand Wazoo
14-04-2009, 09:13
I'm happy with my non-audiophile vinyl versions. I've got several pressings of some of the albums. This is not because I'm an obsessive collector, rather because much of what I own is 2nd hand & I've ended up with several copies before I've found one in truly good nick. This is common with truly great albums as they're always well played!!

I'm not quite 100% happy with my copy of Let It Be - I must've owned 10-12 copies!
(Still looking for a good version of the Doors first album too, come to that!).

I understand the vinyl's never been out of print, but I'm mostly too much of a tight git to buy new!!

Barry
14-04-2009, 20:20
When I first read this, I was surprised that the mixdown masters were still usable. Roger McGuinn decided to go back to the multi-tracks and remix to new mixdown masters when it was decided to remaster The Byrds back catalog. This was necessary because the original mixdown masters were too rough to use, having been played repeatedly over the years for prior CD mastering.........

When WEA set about remastering Love's 'Forever Changes', they found that the mixdown tape had been lost, so had to get in the recording engineer who had done the original mix and ask him to remix from the original multitrack tapes. Considering all he had to go on was his memory and of course the vinyl pressing, I think he did a damm good job.

Barry

Barry
14-04-2009, 20:26
I'll reserve my judgement - let's see how the recordings, that have earned their living more times over than almost any others ever made, are priced.

Agreed! EMI still charge full price for Beatles' CDs, and for those by Pink Floyd as well. My first LP was Beatles 'For Sale' - cost me 97.5p, and I had to save up to buy it.

Barry

The Grand Wazoo
14-04-2009, 21:20
When WEA set about remastering Love's 'Forever Changes', they found that the mixdown tape had been lost, so had to get in the recording engineer who had done the original mix and ask him to remix from the original multitrack tapes. Considering all he had to go on was his memory and of course the vinyl pressing, I think he did a damm good job.

Barry

Forever Changes is one recording I hold most sacred above almost all others, & yes, I think the CD version is pretty good. I've got several different pressings of it on vinyl to compare to. I also think the live version is one of those rare occasions when the performance is as good (better in places!) as the original - the atmosphere of the venue adds a lot. The DVD is fantastic.

So glad I got to see Arthur Lee perform while I had the chance.

hifi_dave
17-04-2009, 16:37
Well, I will be buying the whole bloody collection including the mono's. The more the merrier even if it just gets me a tiny bit more info than I've already got.:mental:

At present I have the original vinyl bought at the time inc a couple of mono's. I also have some Jap pressings, all the MFSL copies as individuals and two (yes two) untouched MFSL Beatles box sets. It's the kids' legacy.:lol:

I have the original vinyl 'Forever Changes' in stereo and mono plus a couple of CD versions, one of which is re-mastered. Is there an extra special version of this ? It is one of my all time faves.:smoking:

Audiocom AV
17-04-2009, 19:09
Well, I will be buying the whole bloody collection including the mono's. The more the merrier even if it just gets me a tiny bit more info than I've already got.:mental:

At present I have the original vinyl bought at the time inc a couple of mono's. I also have some Jap pressings, all the MFSL copies as individuals and two (yes two) untouched MFSL Beatles box sets. It's the kids' legacy.:lol:

I have the original vinyl 'Forever Changes' in stereo and mono plus a couple of CD versions, one of which is re-mastered. Is there an extra special version of this ? It is one of my all time faves.:smoking:

I like it Dave :)

Talking about a tiny bit more info, regarding the CD's have you compared any of the Japan first pressings, the 32DP, 35DP, etc, to the MFSL? If so what were your findings?

Cheers

Mark /Audiocom

hifi_dave
17-04-2009, 21:14
I think, without exception, all the Japanese pressings I have are smoother, perhaps lacking a bit of bite and weight, with quieter surfaces than the originals.
That is where the originals are good pressings to start with.

chris@panteg
09-08-2009, 09:46
Has anyone listened to the 30 sec samples on amazon.com ' i think they do sound very promising indeed even through my creative speaker/sub set up .

I am seriously thinking about buy the stereo box set now (i like pan potted )
the Beatles were the 1st band that i truly loved and am rediscovering that love for the fab four.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/entity/The-Beatles/B000APTK6K?ie=UTF8&ref_=ep_sprkl_mus_B000APTK6K

Joe
09-08-2009, 10:38
I've got all the Beatles' 'proper' LPs except for 'Let It Be', though my mono copy of the White Album is at my sister's house and has been for 20 years or so.

None of them is audiophile in any way; they're a mixture of LPs I bought when they came out, some I bought in the mid-70s when I could afford to buy lots of music, and a couple I bought in the 80s when record shops were getting rid of their stocks of vinyl. Oh, and an Italian pressing of 'Beatles for Sale'.

For me, the Beatles' music 'works' whatever the format; it sounds great even via a cheap AM radio. I might investigate the mono LPs, which are supposedly different from/better than the stereo versions, but with three students in the family money's a bit tight, so food might take priority!

chris@panteg
09-08-2009, 11:36
They are going to be available on vinyl then ' i heard a few rumours but nothing official yet.

REM
09-08-2009, 13:39
They are going to be available on vinyl then ' i heard a few rumours but nothing official yet.

Thought it was going to be C bleedin D only, where are these rumours hailing from???

Oh please let it be true (geddit?) ;)

Cheers

Joe
09-08-2009, 13:46
Thought it was going to be C bleedin D only, where are these rumours hailing from???

Oh please let it be true (geddit?) ;)

Cheers

Here's one rumour site:

http://onethirtybpm.com/2009/06/07/rumor-the-beatles-remastered-mono-and-stereo-catalog-to-be-released-on-180-gram-vinyl/

'Itís been confirmed that the CD remasters and Beatles Rockband game will be released on September 9, 2009, but now it appears that the remastered mono and stereo catalog will be released on 180 gram vinyl will also be tentatively released a month later on November 14.'

chris@panteg
09-08-2009, 15:26
I have just been speaking to my local indie record shop dealer ' (paul) and he told me that the info he has is ' the stereo box set will be issued on vinyl with a limited run of about 1'000 sets.

He seem's to think there will not be a mono set ' but the individual albums will be available on vinyl probably 180gm ' he is going to speak with EMI in the next few days and will give me an update ' so any new info i will post on here .

REM
09-08-2009, 18:45
Thanks for that Chris & Joe


Cheers