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Thread: Ripping Guide

  1. #11
    Join Date: Aug 2010

    Location: Montseny National Park, Catalonia

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    I'm John.

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    Still a big problem for me Tim is I have an enormous amount of very high quality recordings on reel to reel tape and the only satisfactory way Iíve found of transferring them to file is with my mates metric halo and its such a slow process.

    I must admit, very few of my CD purchases are new. Its hard to resist second hand CD's at one or two pounds when you know they'll rip just fine even if some wont play in a CD player.
    Single spur balanced Mains. Self built music server with 3 seperate linear PSU, Intel i5, 16 GB RAM no hard drive (various Linux OS). Benchmark Dac2 HGC, single ended XLR interconnects/Belkin cable. Exposure 21RC Pre, Super 18 Power (recap & modified). Modded World Audio HD83 HP amp. Hand built Monitors with external crossovers , Volt 250 bass & ABR, Scanspeak 13M8621 Mid & Scanspeak D2905/9300 Hi. HD595 & Beyer 880 (600 ohm) cans.

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    John.

  2. #12
    Join Date: Nov 2010

    Location: Coventry

    Posts: 2,872
    I'm Will.

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    I'll agree with most of John's original post...Use a good quality drive, use dBpoweramp (or EAC at a pinch if you have time to kill) etc.

    However I'll have to go with Vincent with regard to the format used for storage...I think we've had this discussion before John

    Rip to FLAC (or ALAC if you're in fruit based world) only (default compression level, 5 in dBpoweramp), and file it in an external drive or NAS, then make an archive copy of this separately. I also keep a RAID copy of my NAS drive...that may be overkill, but you should always have at least one backup copy of your data, so in the interest of cost keep your library in FLAC only. Especially if you have a large collection as most people on this forum are likely to have.

    For backup one of these is a very good option, it's a USB SATA/eSATA docking station, it means you can plug in either 2.5 or 3.5 internal drives (which are very cheap) for your backup media, and obviously you can use multiple different drives for DVD's etc too...I have an eSATA connection from my NAS and it is therefore much quicker than USB.

    http://www.eclipsecomputers.com/prod...SKI-DOCK&af=50

    If I ever want to recreate the WAV or CD I can do so from my FLAC library at any time, perfectly. Or likewise if I want some MP3s for my car the same applies.

    P.S. As John also mentioned the whole ripping process can 'recover' faulty CD's to a great extent, so buying second hand becomes a very safe option...
    Last edited by WAD62; 19-08-2011 at 09:22.
    Cheers, Will

  3. #13
    Join Date: Feb 2010

    Location: London, UK

    Posts: 1,071
    I'm Dave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Welder View Post
    I must admit, very few of my CD purchases are new. Its hard to resist second hand CD's at one or two pounds when you know they'll rip just fine even if some wont play in a CD player.
    That's an interesting comment. I have quite a sizeable subset of my CDs bought at charity shops, and most are OK. However, one, of piano music by Chopin, has a scratch, and several tracks won't play on my CD player - normally quite good at this kind of thing. I've tried polishing out the scratch, so far without success.

    Have you found that it might still be possible to rip such a CD? Seemingly you have. I fairly recently embarked on that process for the rest of my collection (http://theartofsound.net/forum/showthread.php?t=12468 ) but if I could rescue this one by ripping that'd be a bonus. OK it was only £1, but what I heard was good enough to make me want to hear more.
    Dave

  4. #14
    Join Date: Nov 2010

    Location: Coventry

    Posts: 2,872
    I'm Will.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dave2010 View Post
    That's an interesting comment. I have quite a sizeable subset of my CDs bought at charity shops, and most are OK. However, one, of piano music by Chopin, has a scratch, and several tracks won't play on my CD player - normally quite good at this kind of thing. I've tried polishing out the scratch, so far without success.
    Have you found that it might still be possible to rip such a CD? I fairly recently embarked on that process for the rest of my collection (http://theartofsound.net/forum/showthread.php?t=12468 ) but if I could rescue this one by ripping that'd be a bonus. OK it was only £1, but what I heard was good enough to make me want to hear more.
    Dave I've recovered several 'skippy' cd's with dBpoweramp, EAC will also do this, in fact EAC may even be better at recovery.

    The key is to configure the re-rip settings to your drive properly, flushing buffers on a re-read, number of re-reads etc.

    This is where a good quality drive really makes a difference for speed and accuracy, an internal laptop one is a waste of time IMHO
    Cheers, Will

  5. #15
    Join Date: Feb 2011

    Location: Tangxia, China

    Posts: 6,665
    I'm amusicfan.

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    EAC is (IMO) the best at error correction and it's an opinion shared by many others which I why I use it. As a complete package however dBpoweramp is feature rich and very user friendly, but I prefer EAC for it's cue sheets and error correction. But try both I guess and see which you prefer, most go with dB as it's easier to use and does so much more than rip discs, but if error correction is your highest priority I would recommended taking the time to set-up EAC properly.

    If I have scratched discs, I use T-Cut first and give them a good (deep) polish, then it's EAC - so far I have only failed on one track of a Steve Winwood album bought from eBay. The scratch goes through to the dye, so nothing can be done, so buying from eBay and charity shops has never been a bar as far as I'm concerned

    Quote Originally Posted by WAD62 View Post
    This is where a good quality drive really makes a difference for speed and accuracy, an internal laptop one is a waste of time IMHO
    I agree with that too.
    "People will hear what you tell them to hear" - Thomas Edison

  6. #16
    Join Date: Feb 2010

    Location: London, UK

    Posts: 1,071
    I'm Dave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim View Post
    If I have scratched discs, I use T-Cut first and give them a good (deep) polish, then it's EAC - so far I have only failed on one track of a Steve Winwood album bought from eBay. The scratch goes through to the dye, so nothing can be done, so buying from eBay and charity shops has never been a bar as far as I'm concerned
    The brute force approach of trying to rip that Idil Biret piano CD - using iTunes on an iMac - has failed. I can get my PC up and running and use EAC on it. I may have to get the scouring pads and Ajax out too - Brasso was obviously too gentle.

    I thought it was worth a quick try without any further treatment to the CD. It does seem to lock iTunes up from the third track onwards, though the tracks are all recognised, and I did set the audio correction flag.

    Something for later ....
    Dave

  7. #17
    Join Date: Feb 2011

    Location: Tangxia, China

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    I'm amusicfan.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dave2010 View Post
    The brute force approach of trying to rip that Idil Biret piano CD - using iTunes on an iMac - has failed. I can get my PC up and running and use EAC on it. I may have to get the scouring pads and Ajax out too - Brasso was obviously too gentle.

    I thought it was worth a quick try without any further treatment to the CD. It does seem to lock iTunes up from the third track onwards, though the tracks are all recognised, and I did set the audio correction flag.

    Something for later ....
    iTunes is no good for damaged or scratched discs as it has very poor error correction (if you can call it that ). Try using T-Cut instead of Brasso, works very well for me - I had a dreadful disc yesterday from another visit to the charity shop. EAC failed to rip it accurately first time round, but 10 minutes of elbow grease with T-Cut and I now have a bit perfect rip.

    If you are serious about file based audio, it's not really a good idea to be using iTunes to rip discs, fine to use it as a playback medium afterwards if you have a MAC, but it's not the best there is for ripping - this is an opinion not just held by myself

    http://www.computeraudiophile.com
    Last edited by Tim; 20-08-2011 at 12:48.
    "People will hear what you tell them to hear" - Thomas Edison

  8. #18
    Join Date: Feb 2010

    Location: London, UK

    Posts: 1,071
    I'm Dave.

    Default Success! Brasso worked eventually!

    I did more rubbing with Brasso. Superficially I put a lot of radial scratches on the disc, but eventually I gave up, rinsed it under the tap, dried it off. Then put it back into my iMac and waited. This time iTunes seems to have ripped the whole thing, and interestingly the time for each track seemed very much shorter. I'm guessing that the CD may still be difficult to play, but now I've digitised it - hopefully accurately - I should be able to play the files or make a CD copy.

    It was rather tedious nevertheless, but I thought it was worth trying to rescue this one - Naxos 8.550358 Idil Biret Chopin Mazurkas - the things I'll do to avoid having to pay out more money for a new copy!
    Dave

  9. #19
    Join Date: Apr 2009

    Location: Sheffield

    Posts: 2,028
    I'm Confused.

    Question Ripping Question.

    As far as my experience goes with EAC and dbPoweramp it is only possible to rip from inbuilt or USB connected exterior drives - is this correct? The reason I ask is that I have a PC with a M-Audio 24/96 PCI card and this has a co-ax input as well as RCA line inputs - I also have a NAD T585 multi-format disc player with coax and line outputs. Could I get a lossless recording using EAC or dbPoweramp from the higher resolution outputs from the NAD player?
    Anyone able to help or comment?
    Cheers,
    Dave.
    DaveK.

    My System:
    Power: Belkin PF40, Custom.hifi.cables Hydra and DC PSUs.
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  10. #20
    Join Date: Nov 2010

    Location: Coventry

    Posts: 2,872
    I'm Will.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveK View Post
    As far as my experience goes with EAC and dbPoweramp it is only possible to rip from inbuilt or USB connected exterior drives - is this correct? The reason I ask is that I have a PC with a M-Audio 24/96 PCI card and this has a co-ax input as well as RCA line inputs - I also have a NAD T585 multi-format disc player with coax and line outputs. Could I get a lossless recording using EAC or dbPoweramp from the higher resolution outputs from the NAD player?
    Anyone able to help or comment?
    Cheers,
    Dave.
    EAC & dBpoweramp are CD rippers, what you're talking about is a digital recording...you'll need something like Audacity (free) for digital/analogue recording from your soundcard...or Pro-Tools if you have the money
    Cheers, Will

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