+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 22

Thread: Plug sockets

  1. #11
    Join Date: Mar 2017

    Location: Seaford UK

    Posts: 623
    I'm Dennis.

    Default

    I've coincidentally been contemplating this point recently, and it seems that there are conflicting factors to consider.

    I agree Marco about your conclusion from an earthing standpoint, but this means that the other items, often drawing much more current, eg. power amps, will draw that current past the sensitive items, possibly causing a voltage drop which may appear in series with paths of the sensitive ones.

  2. #12
    Join Date: Jan 2013

    Location: Birmingham

    Posts: 3,695
    I'm James.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    Do remember that on double wall sockets, the earth usually connects to the L/H side of the socket (where there is provision for such), not the right, therefore for that reason, quite often you'll find that equipment plugged into the L/H side of a wall socket sounds better.

    Now, if your mains distribution block is plugged into the L/H side of one of your sockets, then everything connected to the block is taking advantage of that improved connection, which may explain what you're hearing.

    It's one of the reasons why I always go for single wall sockets, rather than double, as each will have its own individual earth point. And if you're using a distribution block, you should always plug the most sonically influential kit into the socket nearest the incoming mains (the first one next to the cable powering the block), followed by the next most sonically influential, etc.

    The most sonically influential piece of kit, for me, is always your main source (T/T, CDP or whatever), followed by preamp, then power amp. Although, in a vinyl system, a separate phono stage would come before the preamp.

    Let me give an example...

    Say you've got a CDP/T/T/phonostage/preamp and power amp, and a 6-way distribution block, plugged into the L/H side of a double wall socket, and the T/T is your main source. Then I'd plug the T/T into position 1 (first socket nearest the incoming mains), phonostage into position 2, CDP into position 3, preamp into position 4, and power amp into position 5.

    *However* sometimes power amps benefit from being connected to their own dedicated wall socket. Therefore, in your case, with two double sockets, you may benefit from connecting your distribution block to the L/H side of one socket (with your equipment plugged into it as outlined), and isolate the power amp, by plugging it alone into the L/H side of the other double socket.

    Anyway, just a few things for you to consider!

    Marco.
    Thanks Marco, your last paragraph relates to the only combination I have not tried yet so this needs to be evaluated. However I do concur that the L/H double socket is proving to sound noticeably better than the right so you are spot on there!

  3. #13
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 77,276
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pharos View Post
    I agree Marco about your conclusion from an earthing standpoint, but this means that the other items, often drawing much more current, eg. power amps, will draw that current past the sensitive items, possibly causing a voltage drop which may appear in series with paths of the sensitive ones.
    Yup, which is why, as I've said, there may be some benefit had by plugging the power amp into its own socket.

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

  4. #14
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

    Posts: 77,276
    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Jimbo View Post
    Thanks Marco, your last paragraph relates to the only combination I have not tried yet so this needs to be evaluated. However I do concur that the L/H double socket is proving to sound noticeably better than the right so you are spot on there!
    No problem, Jim. I went through all this stuff years ago, in my mains tweaking days, and learnt a lot. Try it and see what you think, and also (if necessary) revise the order of plug-in on your mains block, as outlined.

    Aside from whether your power amp will benefit accordingly or not, the L/H side of a double wall socket will generally always sound best, because of the earth factor...

    It really just highlights how important earth arrangements are in any mains installation, and also the potential bottleneck introduced by any type of socket, which is why, if you can, hard-wiring is always best!

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

  5. #15
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Norwich

    Posts: 680
    I'm Mike.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post

    Aside from whether your power amp will benefit accordingly or not, the L/H side of a double wall socket will generally always sound best, because of the earth factor... It really just highlights how important earth arrangements are in any mains installation, and also the potential bottleneck introduced by any type of socket, which is why, if you can, hard-wiring is always best!

    Marco.
    Agreed and impressed, Marco. I'm still working out what a plug socket is.......... Your astute comment regarding the earth connection on double sockets prompted me to ferret out my old MK unswitched doubles last used two decades ago, and they have this connection on the r/h side looking from the front, as has a switched double I found in my box of mains rubbish. However, these each have a substantial metal bar joining the two earth pin entry points. Unless different brands are different, maybe you were looking at the back, as one does, of course.

    Hard wiring is fine for dedicated radial circuits with adequate protection (as I have and imagine you still do), but it's a bit more tricky with combinations of plug, fuse, socket and ring mains. I do agree, though, as most aficionados would, the value of the earth to sonic nirvana, or at least, dynamics. Something about impedance, I vaguely remember, but it's far too technical for my senile brain. Another point is the importance of keeping ALL contacts (plug pins, sockets (if accessible) and fuse holders, clean, pref. by using a de-oxidant application.

    As an adjunct, although we both ( I think) believe in the mains supply importance, I've been cogitating a theory that dedicated mains may not be as important for or effective with valved kit as with s/s (and esp. Naim !). This is not to decry a decent mains delivery system, of course, but could have something to do with the difference between toroidal and other types of tranny. Just a thought.

  6. #16
    Join Date: Jan 2013

    Location: Birmingham

    Posts: 3,695
    I'm James.

    Default

    I thought I had improved my mains connections, power leads, sockets etc as much as I could without resorting to separate Radial but it just goes to show small detail can make a significant difference. It never occurred to me that one side of a plug socket could make a difference!

    All these small differences make such a difference when they are all added together however I feel the biggest difference would be if I could clean up the power supply and reduce the noise floor and go off grid.

    This should do the trick.

    https://stromtank.com/s5000hp/

  7. #17
    Join Date: Oct 2008

    Location: Glasgowshire

    Posts: 6,639
    I'm availableforweddingsAndBarmitzvas.

    Default

    Have you looked into balanced mains feeding your kit James?
    I have hifi n stuff.


  8. #18
    Join Date: Nov 2015

    Location: Wolverhampton

    Posts: 5,219
    I'm Oliver.

    Default

    That's worked wonders here.
    Quote Originally Posted by Gazjam View Post
    Have you looked into balanced mains feeding your kit James?
    Analogue: Technics SP10 MK2 > Phonomac AT-1010 tonearm > Ortofon Kontrapunkt b > Wizard Jfet MC Valve Phonostage (Telefunken Valves)
    Digital: Firebottle modded Xiang Sheng DAC (Telefunken Valve)
    Amplification: Slagle AVC Passive Preamp & Firebottle Monoblocks (Telefunken Valves)
    Cables: Fisual S-Flex Speaker Cable & SPOTFIRE IC Cables Throughout
    Speakers: Pioneer CS-77A

  9. #19
    Join Date: Jan 2013

    Location: Birmingham

    Posts: 3,695
    I'm James.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gazjam View Post
    Have you looked into balanced mains feeding your kit James?
    I have toyed with the idea and I am convinced it will improve things a fair bit. I am sure this will happen in the near future but I have quite a few plans ahead just at the moment!

  10. #20
    Join Date: Jan 2013

    Location: Birmingham

    Posts: 3,695
    I'm James.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marco View Post
    No problem, Jim. I went through all this stuff years ago, in my mains tweaking days, and learnt a lot. Try it and see what you think, and also (if necessary) revise the order of plug-in on your mains block, as outlined.

    Aside from whether your power amp will benefit accordingly or not, the L/H side of a double wall socket will generally always sound best, because of the earth factor...

    It really just highlights how important earth arrangements are in any mains installation, and also the potential bottleneck introduced by any type of socket, which is why, if you can, hard-wiring is always best!

    Marco.
    I have now plugged power amp into left hand side of socket and distribution block in other side which has pre amp and turntable plugged in. This set up sounds best.

+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast



 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •