+ Reply to Thread
Page 13 of 15 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 LastLast
Results 121 to 130 of 146

Thread: Who Likes Aircraft?

  1. #121
    Join Date: Feb 2017

    Location: Sussex

    Posts: 227
    I'm Simon.

    Default

    All the wind tunnel tests I've watched show smoked air going around a wing, and you can clearly see it's faster on the top surface. Breaking up as the wing angle of attack becomes excessive, which is what the stall is, and why you get stall buffet when flying light aircraft. The air hits the tailplane and causes this buffet.

    I respect others views and am not putting people down, but would love to understand how you think Bernoulli is wrong or 'venturi' effects cause the effects.

    Bernoullis principle also not only explains lift over a wing but the effects of high and low pressure on either side of a control surface. So when the right aileron goes up, the static pressure is increased by virtue of the aieleron slowing the air over the top surface by moving up. The opposite on the left wing, with the left aileron going down, causes the differential lift and hence banking to the right. The same happens with the elevators and rudder in the pitching and yawing planes. Also Bernoulli accounts why if air hits the tail plane and moves the tailplane to the right, it's right surface has a higher static pressure because the big keel surface of the tail plane presented to the air flow, slows the air down. The pressure difference to the left side of the tailplane means the tailplane moves back in line. The same thing happens with the elevators and a dihedral wing, but concorde had a anhedral wing and no elevators or horizontal stabiliser.

    https://youtu.be/q_eMQvDoDWk
    Speakers : PMC Twenty5 23's

    Cyrus Gear : DAC XP Signature / PSX-R, Mono X200 Signatures, Stream X Signature, CD-T transport

    Chord Cables : Signature Tuned Array XLR, Epic Reference Speaker Cable, Anthem tuned array and Clearway digital coaxial

  2. #122
    Join Date: Dec 2008

    Location: Lincolnshire, Home by the Sea

    Posts: 3,314
    I'm Shaun.

    Default

    A wing is curved on the top surface thus giving the air over that surface further to travel. This makes that air slower and so decreases the pressure atop the wing creating a partial vacuum. This is the cause of the lift experienced by that aerofoil.
    Nottingham Analogue Interspace deck - Funk Firm Achromat - Origin Live Onyx tonearm - Denon DL103
    Marantz CD6005 into an Audiolab M-DAC latest Lake West firmware

    Prima Luna Prologue 3 preamplifier - Rothwell MC Headamp
    Prima Luna Dialogue Premium power amp EL34

    B&W CM8 S2 loudspeakers

    Van Den Hul Teatrack biwired loudspeaker cables
    Atlas Hyper MkII interconnects
    QED Reference Audio 40 on phono stages
    Grado SR125e headphones

  3. #123
    Join Date: Feb 2017

    Location: Sussex

    Posts: 227
    I'm Simon.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Haselsh1 View Post
    A wing is curved on the top surface thus giving the air over that surface further to travel. This makes that air slower and so decreases the pressure atop the wing creating a partial vacuum. This is the cause of the lift experienced by that aerofoil.
    I think though it has to be explained by the effect on a surface doesn't it?, which is what is said when referring to static pressure ie the pressure on a surface. Air can't have a different static pressure by virtue of moving slower or faster, it can have different energy, since static pressure does refer to the effect on a surface.

    Also you can have a symmetrical aerofoil (curved equally on top to bottom) generate lift by its incidence to the fuselage. This is what aerobatic aircraft like extras and sukhois use but I agree with the sentiment of your point which is effectively to do this in a different way using incidence. That's what Concorde was effectively doing when landing. However the air actually moves faster over the top surface whisking away away those air molecules to exert a pressure on the wing upper surface hence reducing static pressure on the upper wing surface.
    Speakers : PMC Twenty5 23's

    Cyrus Gear : DAC XP Signature / PSX-R, Mono X200 Signatures, Stream X Signature, CD-T transport

    Chord Cables : Signature Tuned Array XLR, Epic Reference Speaker Cable, Anthem tuned array and Clearway digital coaxial

  4. #124
    Join Date: Dec 2008

    Location: Lincolnshire, Home by the Sea

    Posts: 3,314
    I'm Shaun.

    Default

    The air on the top of a wing cannot move faster than that below as it has farther to travel. This is what results in the low pressure that results in lift. This is basic GCSE physics.
    Nottingham Analogue Interspace deck - Funk Firm Achromat - Origin Live Onyx tonearm - Denon DL103
    Marantz CD6005 into an Audiolab M-DAC latest Lake West firmware

    Prima Luna Prologue 3 preamplifier - Rothwell MC Headamp
    Prima Luna Dialogue Premium power amp EL34

    B&W CM8 S2 loudspeakers

    Van Den Hul Teatrack biwired loudspeaker cables
    Atlas Hyper MkII interconnects
    QED Reference Audio 40 on phono stages
    Grado SR125e headphones

  5. #125
    Join Date: May 2012

    Location: Toulouse

    Posts: 3,569
    I'm GettingFunky.

    Default

    I don't think you remember you GCSE very well, and I do not agree with you.

    http://www.explainthatstuff.com/howplaneswork.html
    Kevin

    Funkified Technics SL1200 Mk2 (Funk FX-1200+, Hana SL/AT33PTG/II/, Funk Firm "Strata" platter, "Spin" bearing and BO!NG Isolation feet, MCRU/LDA PSU). Pioneer PD-S703. Caiman II. Firebottle KIN. Firebottle Monoblocks, Graham Slee Solo Ultra Linear Headphone amp. Electric Beach FH3 with Taket BatPure super tweeters. Sennheiser HD540 Reference II & HD650. DIY Klotz MC5000/MS Audio interconnects. Talk cable 3 speaker cable. Power Inspired AG1500

  6. #126
    Join Date: Feb 2013

    Location: W Lothian

    Posts: 32,087
    I'm Grant.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CageyH View Post
    I don't think you remember you GCSE very well, and I do not agree with you.

    http://www.explainthatstuff.com/howplaneswork.html
    Hey, i was right lol
    Regards,
    Grant ....
    Sometimes incompetence is useful. It helps you keep an open mind.
    .... ..... ...... ...... ................... ..... ..... ..... ..... .....
    IMUTO TAURUS X4 BATTERY SUPPLY. - RPI2B & AUDIOPHONICS DAC running MOODE 3.6- TONBRUX BATTERY SUPPLY & CHROMECAST2 AUDIO DONGLE no1 - JBE SERIES 3 SLATEDECK & EMOTIVA XPS-1 PHONO - DENON DV2900 & HEAVILY MODDED MF X10v3. BERESFORD SWITCHBOX. - TWIN PRO MONOBLOCK AMPLIFIERS. - CREEK OBH-11SE HEADPHONE AMP. -AUDIO TECHNICA ATH-MSR7 HEADPHONES - WIN10 JRIVER22, SPOTIFY PREMIUM- OPPO PM-3 PLANAR HEADPHONES, KINPS CABLES, SMSL M6 MINIDAC, CHROMECAST2 AUDIO DONGLE no2 POWERED BY ANKER BATTERY PSU - FULL RANGE TWIN & SINGLE TELEFUNKEN's - TANDBERG TCD310 - CARTS.. AT95 Shibata, SHURE M55E original, JVC MD1029. - RCA CABLES BY BRIAN SPKR CABLES BY MOI HAIR BY MARCO FEET BY ELECTRICBEACH - MAINS REGENERATED BY POWERINSPIRED AND FILTERED BY BELKIN PUREAV.

  7. #127
    Join Date: Feb 2017

    Location: Sussex

    Posts: 227
    I'm Simon.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by struth View Post
    Hey, i was right lol
    Yes because the curved top surface is longer than the flater under surface, so the air is accelerated. When the airstream meets the wing leading edge some of it goes over the top and the rest under the wing, but it must meet at the trailing edge at the same point - this is part of fluid or air dynamics. As the top surface is longer the air must have travelled faster for the same time it got from the leading edge to trailing edge for air going under the wing.

    But if it's to do with wing incidence in a aerobatic aerofoil which often has a symmetrical wing (same curve on top as on bottom), the wing must be angled up at the airflow where it's fitted to the fuselage, to create the acceleration of air over the top. If it wasn't angled up the air over the top and bottom would travel the same speed, there would be no static pressure differences, and the wing would not generate lift.
    Speakers : PMC Twenty5 23's

    Cyrus Gear : DAC XP Signature / PSX-R, Mono X200 Signatures, Stream X Signature, CD-T transport

    Chord Cables : Signature Tuned Array XLR, Epic Reference Speaker Cable, Anthem tuned array and Clearway digital coaxial

  8. #128
    Join Date: Mar 2008

    Location: Dunfermline, Scotland, UK

    Posts: 12,086
    I'm inthescottishmafia.

    Default

    No, the air is not accelerated. It is forced downwards towards the trailing edge of the aerofoil, creating a lower pressure, due to the angle of attack of the wing, this also means the air is compressed below the wing, giving higher pressure. This is what creates lift, NOT faster airflow over the top of the wing.
    There are times when you canít do the sensible thing, when you canít act like a responsible adult at all; you just have to do whatever insane thing comes into your head. When bad people do it they end up murderers, when good people do it they end up heroes, and when the rest of us do it we end up looking like total idiots. But whenís that ever stopped us?

  9. #129
    Join Date: Feb 2017

    Location: Sussex

    Posts: 227
    I'm Simon.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ali Tait View Post
    No, the air is not accelerated. It is forced downwards towards the trailing edge of the aerofoil, creating a lower pressure, due to the angle of attack of the wing, this also means the air is compressed below the wing, giving higher pressure. This is what creates lift, NOT faster airflow over the top of the wing.

    It is accelerated because it must get to to same point at the trailing edge as the air going underneath. It's forced downwards yes, as the aerofoil surface angles away downwards on the top of the wing.

    A conventional aerofoil wing shape doesn't have to be at an angle of attack to the airflow to create lift though. Angle of attack is simply the angle of the wing to the airflow. If the wing is flat with the airflow, lift will happen as airflow speed increases, otherwise an aircraft with a wing with limited incidence to the fuselage would not generate lift. I've made radio control model aeroplanes with no wing incidence (to create an angle of attack in level fligh) but they fly with the throttle in the same position and maintain height. This is just lift over the wing at a certain speed with the wing at no angle of attack to the airflow.

    Compression of air doesn't explain static pressure acting on a surface and by bernoullis theory that the faster it travels the less static pressure can occur. My point is it's this differential between static pressure on the upper and lower surfaces which creates an upward lifting force.
    Speakers : PMC Twenty5 23's

    Cyrus Gear : DAC XP Signature / PSX-R, Mono X200 Signatures, Stream X Signature, CD-T transport

    Chord Cables : Signature Tuned Array XLR, Epic Reference Speaker Cable, Anthem tuned array and Clearway digital coaxial

  10. #130
    Join Date: Feb 2017

    Location: Sussex

    Posts: 227
    I'm Simon.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ali Tait View Post
    No, the air is not accelerated. It is forced downwards towards the trailing edge of the aerofoil, creating a lower pressure, due to the angle of attack of the wing, this also means the air is compressed below the wing, giving higher pressure. This is what creates lift, NOT faster airflow over the top of the wing.

    It is accelerated because it must get to to same point at the trailing edge as the air going underneath. It's forced downwards yes, as the aerofoil surface angles away downwards on the top of the wing.

    A conventional aerofoil wing shape doesn't have to be at an angle of attack to the airflow to create lift though. Angle of attack is simply the angle of the wing to the airflow. If the wing is flat with the airflow, lift will happen as airflow speed increases, otherwise an aircraft with a wing with limited incidence to the fuselage would not generate lift. I've made radio control model aeroplanes with no wing incidence (to create an angle of attack in level fligh) but they fly with the throttle in the same position and maintain height. This is just lift over the wing at a certain speed with the wing at no angle of attack to the airflow.

    Compression of air doesn't explain static pressure acting on a surface and by bernoullis theory that the faster it travels the less static pressure can occur. My point is it's this differential between static pressure on the upper and lower surfaces which creates an upward lifting force.
    Speakers : PMC Twenty5 23's

    Cyrus Gear : DAC XP Signature / PSX-R, Mono X200 Signatures, Stream X Signature, CD-T transport

    Chord Cables : Signature Tuned Array XLR, Epic Reference Speaker Cable, Anthem tuned array and Clearway digital coaxial

+ Reply to Thread
Page 13 of 15 FirstFirst ... 31112131415 LastLast



 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •