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Thread: Who Likes Aircraft?

  1. #131
    Join Date: May 2012

    Location: Toulouse

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    I'm GettingFunky.

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    It's all based on this - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bernoulli's_principle

    A lower pressure exists above the wing (due to the increased velocity of the air passing over the top skin) which is what creates lift.
    When more lift is required, the effective curvature is increased with the addition of slats, flaps and other high lift devices.
    Kevin

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  2. #132
    Join Date: Feb 2017

    Location: Sussex

    Posts: 324
    I'm Simon.

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    Yes I totally agree on that with slats and flaps etc, but also lift relative to speed etc. but the reason why Bernoulli found faster air or water has less pressure, is because of its effect on a surface. Without any effect on a surface and just saying fast air has less pressure doesn't explain it, since fast air cannot exert a pressure if there is no surface. This is called static pressure,ie pressure of air molecules acting on a surface. Think of it as the amount of air molecules that can bounce on and off a surface exerting pressure affected by how quickly or not they are moved away. The more moved away by faster air the less static pressure. He also referred to it as Venturi effects ie passing water and air through a wide and narrow pipe which is the same thing.

    As already said it's because the air around a surface is whisked away it can have less static pressure on a surface. What's happening when you have a shower and the curtain gets sucked to your body is because the fast shower water and air it moves is creating low pressure on one side of the curtain. The air is being whisked away from one side of the curtain by the fast flowing water, so the static pressure is less relative to the other side of the curtain, where the air is not whisked away relatively as much. So the static pressure is greater on the outside surface. Hence you have two pressure differences acting on both sides of the shower curtain.

    I've understood this from reading my pooleys aeroplane technical manual and as a hobby pilot myself (mainly gliders). It's very interesting and I'll take some pics of the relevant pages. It's interesting how the proper explanation of how wings work is not often explained online etc by static pressure differences
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #133
    Join Date: Apr 2012

    Location: Southall, West London

    Posts: 26,827
    I'm Geoff.

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    Mr. Tact!

    Main system: MMs/ADCs/Low output MC's/One rare Japanese SUT/One scarce British phono stage/various tonearms/hefty Japanese DD TT and hefty Japanese BD TT and small British BD TT. 4 CD players/2 jitter buster/2 DACs/Valve buffer. TVC stepped attenuator or valve pre-amp or solid state pre-amp. Current dumping power-amp or either of two Class A SS power-amp or Class A EL34 valve monos or big Japanese (part Class A) integrated. Big dual concentric speakers/Smaller dual concentric speakers/Two way British compacts and full range speakers, amongst others. And too much more to list!

  4. #134
    Join Date: Feb 2013

    Location: North Yorkshire

    Posts: 65
    I'm Mark.

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    The LP that forms my avatar is one of the first records I remember hearing. It was one of my fathers and when he passed away a few years ago I inherited his small collection of vinyl.

    It wasn't until recently acquiring a Croft Vitale pre-amp that I began going through albums I haven't listened to for a long time and seeing as though I use this one on here I thought it was due a spin.

    It is mostly pishanto !! but the recording quality is good on some tracks and there is a decent rendition of 633 Squadron. I think it was this track (which I'd forgotten about) that attracted me to the LP in the first place. Anyway it brought back happy memories of when that was one of my favourite films and reminded me just how much I like Mosquitos.

    It also demonstrates yet again that link between music and aircraft, tenuous though it may be. A combination that provides a time machine.

    PS - isn't the cover an image of 'Concorde' going through the sound barrier ??

  5. #135
    Join Date: Feb 2017

    Location: Essex-Herts border

    Posts: 21
    I'm Matt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vinyl turner View Post

    Anyway it brought back happy memories of when that was one of my favourite films and reminded me just how much I like Mosquitos.
    Another Mosquito lover here.
    If you haven't read it, the book "The walls came tumbling down" by Jack Fishman, about the raid on the jail at Amiens is a very good read.
    The raid flew from Hunsdon airfield, which is very close to where I now live. Its now a micro-light flying club. There is a (to my mind) fairly insignificant memorial to the crew of the raid there.
    It amazes me, how many people drive past there without knowing anything about the history of that airfield. But then I guess you could say that about a lot of WW2 airfields that have gone back to being farmers fields.
    Matt.

  6. #136
    Join Date: Feb 2013

    Location: North Yorkshire

    Posts: 65
    I'm Mark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Manicatel View Post
    .......
    The raid flew from Hunsdon airfield, which is very close to where I now live. Its now a micro-light flying club. There is a (to my mind) fairly insignificant memorial to the crew of the raid there.
    It amazes me, how many people drive past there without knowing anything about the history of that airfield. But then I guess you could say that about a lot of WW2 airfields that have gone back to being farmers fields.
    Matt.
    I agree - for years I'd driven up & down the A1 and knew the Black Cat roundabout and the signposted village of Tempsford nearby. I then read a book about the SOE and the Lysander pilots who dropped them off across occupied Europe, most of which (if not all) flew from what was then RAF Tempsford.

    Likewise, further north is the strangely named Woolfox (Depot) which was a missile site in the early days of the Cold War, but had previously been a night-fighter base.

  7. #137
    Join Date: Dec 2008

    Location: Lincolnshire, Home by the Sea

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    I'm Shaun.

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    Gibraltar Farm, the code name for RAF Tempsford and a shot of the famous barn. The last place in England these glorious people saw before being parachuted into enemy France.
    There is an amazing tribute in the centre of the village to those who never made it home.
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  8. #138
    Join Date: Jul 2014

    Location: Shropshire

    Posts: 1,692
    I'm Anto.

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    Great stories Men !!! keep it up.!!
    The Mosquito was a real beauty . I very often used to see the one from RAF Hawarden in North Wales come to Whixall Moss by us ,and spent 15 mins or so doing acrobatics . She was the one that crashed a few yrs later (cant remember her serial)
    Truthfully ,it was almost as good as sex , watching her roll and dive , and a thing I will never forget !
    I only ride 'em, I don't know what makes 'em work

  9. #139
    Join Date: Apr 2012

    Location: Southall, West London

    Posts: 26,827
    I'm Geoff.

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    The English Electric Canberra was a great plane. Fast for its time and very agile. Noisy bugger though.

    Here's a nice clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ER4tfH2Szoc
    Mr. Tact!

    Main system: MMs/ADCs/Low output MC's/One rare Japanese SUT/One scarce British phono stage/various tonearms/hefty Japanese DD TT and hefty Japanese BD TT and small British BD TT. 4 CD players/2 jitter buster/2 DACs/Valve buffer. TVC stepped attenuator or valve pre-amp or solid state pre-amp. Current dumping power-amp or either of two Class A SS power-amp or Class A EL34 valve monos or big Japanese (part Class A) integrated. Big dual concentric speakers/Smaller dual concentric speakers/Two way British compacts and full range speakers, amongst others. And too much more to list!

  10. #140
    Join Date: Feb 2013

    Location: North Yorkshire

    Posts: 65
    I'm Mark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Oddball View Post
    Great stories Men !!! keep it up.!!
    The Mosquito was a real beauty . I very often used to see the one from RAF Hawarden in North Wales come to Whixall Moss by us ,and spent 15 mins or so doing acrobatics . She was the one that crashed a few yrs later (cant remember her serial)
    Truthfully ,it was almost as good as sex , watching her roll and dive , and a thing I will never forget !
    You were a lucky guy to see that, I never did sees flying one. There is a static Mossy in the Yorkshire Air Museum at Elvington and there was a great website from a guy building one from scratch in New Zealand which I think is now living in N America.

    I have a book somewhere called Mosquito Racer, which is by and about a Canadian pilot who flew in the air ferry service during WWII and in later years entered the air races in N America where planes such as Mustangs were prominent. He decided that what he needed to take those guys on was an agile plane and decided two RR Merlin engines would do nicely ..... The rest of the story is all about getting set up and entering the races with a Mossy.
    An unusual story and very interesting. I seem to recall a few of the people involved were quite frightened by this thing as it took a bit of handling !!

    .........Don't get me started !

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