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Thread: Help required with recognising a DC power socket type

  1. #1
    Join Date: Jun 2015

    Location: London, UK

    Posts: 777
    I'm Lawrence.

    Default Help required with recognising a DC power socket type

    I've bought an Arcaydis interface buffer and it works very nicely with my class D power amp but I'm thinking about upgrading the PSU. The thing is I don't know where to get a plug from it's a screw in type as shown here does anyone know what it's actually called?


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  2. #2
    Join Date: Jun 2015

    Location: London, UK

    Posts: 777
    I'm Lawrence.

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    They are not proprietary as this seems to use the same ones

    http://pages.ebay.com/link/?nav=item...d=271930160647


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  3. #3
    Join Date: Feb 2008

    Location: Near Accrington, Lancs, UK

    Posts: 288
    I'm Ralph.

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    You can buy those from Maplin.
    Ralph.

  4. #4
    Join Date: Oct 2015

    Location: Pulborough, West Sussex, UK

    Posts: 473
    I'm Ian.

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    It looks like the same plug use for communications microphones

    http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/like/13080...6760769&crdt=0
    My stuff; Toshiba SR-370/Mission 774 OG/Ortofon 2M Black, Cambridge CXC CD transport/Musical Fidelity X DAC/Musical Fidelity X10v3 tube buffer, Musical Fidelity A3, Nakamichi CA-5E pre amp, Acoustic Solutions FM/DAB tuner, Mordaunt Short Signifer, Harbeth Compact 7, Klotz MC5000/MS audio, NVA LS5

  5. #5
    Join Date: Jun 2015

    Location: London, UK

    Posts: 777
    I'm Lawrence.

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    Thanks the metal case looks the same but it seems to have 4 holes in the female whereas mine has 2


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  6. #6
    Join Date: Jun 2015

    Location: London, UK

    Posts: 777
    I'm Lawrence.

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    Here's another question related to using a buffer. If a passive pre has a higher impedance than the input impedance of the power amp, is there a risk the resistors will get hot or be overdriven ? Presumably one reason it is not a good match is that a lot of the energy is being wasted in the passive and not getting to the power amp?


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  7. #7
    Join Date: Sep 2013

    Location: North Island New Zealand

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    I'm Chris.

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    The answer is they are a Marushin plug, and although not pictured match with a corresponding socket.
    http://www.skt.cz/marushin/pdf/m-cn.pdf

    Available in many variety of pin numbers, they are are useful connector, although not strictly a DC connector
    but can be assigned for that purpose, as long as polarity is matched. A precaution is to use a diode either
    in series anode In to Cathode out in the DC circuitry , or a diode in a shunt configuration, to protect
    against incorrect polarity or circumstance where polarity is not obvious. Even my my soldering iron has one

  8. #8
    Join Date: Sep 2013

    Location: North Island New Zealand

    Posts: 822
    I'm Chris.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lawrence001 View Post
    Here's another question related to using a buffer. If a passive pre has a higher impedance than the input impedance of the power amp, is there a risk the resistors will get hot or be overdriven ? Presumably one reason it is not a good match is that a lot of the energy is being wasted in the passive and not getting to the power amp?


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    Most passive pre's are defined as an L Pad, although other Pad types are sometimes used, they are less common.
    a properly designed L pad then has a series resistance and a shunt resistance. They are an attenuator.
    Your assertion they are wasting power is somewhat false as- attenuators are needed pieces of circuitry.
    You are seeing problems which are not there.

    No, resistors will not get hot or be overdriven. A sensible designer allows for Ohms law and predicts current expended
    which in the case of passive pre's is tiny, so very small wattage resistors in 99% of cases are quite OK to use.

    With Light Dependent Resistors the mechanical wiping of one contact on another passing
    audio signals is removed entirely, rather just light emission in an encapsulated space causes variance in resistance
    hence are a far better and clever device for audio.

  9. #9
    Join Date: Feb 2013

    Location: W Lothian

    Posts: 34,389
    I'm Grant.

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    They are used on back of Chinese psu s. As well mine has 2 of the 2 pin ones as dc outs
    Regards,
    Grant ....
    Sometimes incompetence is useful. It helps you keep an open mind.
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  10. #10
    Join Date: Jun 2015

    Location: London, UK

    Posts: 777
    I'm Lawrence.

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Light Dependant Resistor View Post
    Most passive pre's are defined as an L Pad, although other Pad types are sometimes used, they are less common.
    a properly designed L pad then has a series resistance and a shunt resistance. They are an attenuator.
    Your assertion they are wasting power is somewhat false as- attenuators are needed pieces of circuitry.
    You are seeing problems which are not there.

    No, resistors will not get hot or be overdriven. A sensible designer allows for Ohms law and predicts current expended
    which in the case of passive pre's is tiny, so very small wattage resistors in 99% of cases are quite OK to use.

    With Light Dependent Resistors the mechanical wiping of one contact on another passing
    audio signals is removed entirely, rather just light emission in an encapsulated space causes variance in resistance
    hence are a far better and clever device for audio.
    Thanks for that in my case I'm using an original style tisbury passive pre which I didn't know has a shunt resistor. Hopefully I've got nothing to worry about anyway.



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