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Thread: Marco's cleaning process with new vinyl, using an RCM

  1. #1
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

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    I'm AudioAl'sArbiterForPISHANTO.

    Default Marco's cleaning process with new vinyl, using an RCM

    Quote Originally Posted by YNWaN View Post
    What is true is that the dryer the atmosphere is the more likely static is - not the other way round.
    Indeed, and of course it's important to remember that, because of that, the levels of static and dust experienced will vary depending upon the environment one inhabits

    For reference, here's the process I use for cleaning new records (bearing in mind that I use a VPI RCM):

    1) Ensure that one's hands, together with the platter mat of the VPI machine, are spotlessly clean before handling records, and also for placing the first record on the platter for cleaning. Fit the nozzle, used in the drying process, reserved specifically for cleaning new records, and prepare the VPI brush for use, also reserved solely for the same purpose. Ensure that both are spotlessly clean before beginning the cleaning process.

    Yes, to avoid the contamination of new records, I have separate brushes and nozzles for cleaning both new and used vinyl!

    2) Switch on RCM, and whilst the platter is in motion, slowly 'drizzle' the cleaning solution (which I make up myself), in small amounts, onto the surface of the record, ensuring even coverage.

    3) Switch off RCM, and in a circular motion, with the pristine clean brush, reserved solely for cleaning new records, gently 'work' the liquid into the record grooves, ensuring that the entire surface of the record is coated in the cleaning solution. Then allow it to penetrate into the grooves for about 10 seconds and loosen any dirt or mould release agent, located deep within the grooves, which may remain as a by-product of the vinyl manufacturing process.

    4) Switch RCM back on, and whilst holding the brush vertically over the record surface, press it gently into the record grooves, as the platter is in motion, and keep it there for a two or three revolutions, allowing the brush to lift up any 'crud' that shouldn't be there, and allow it to accumulate underneath the bristles.

    5) Lift the brush off of the record, and whilst the platter is still in motion, place the drying nozzle over the accumulated cleaning solution, containing the removed debris (invisible to the naked eye), switch on the vacuum cleaner and proceed to 'hoover up' all of the solution until the record is bone dry and sparkling clean. Leave the record on the platter just for a few seconds to allow it to 'air dry' before turning it over and repeating the whole cleaning process for 'Side B'.

    6) Once done, [this is where the Zerostat gun comes in], there is usually a small build of static, as a result of the felt strips, fitted to the drying nozzle, passing over the record surface and making light contact with it, during the drying process. Therefore, simply 'zap' the record surface once with the Zerostat gun, thereby discharging it from any static, lift the record off of the platter and pop it into an anti-static record sleeve.

    Job done! The record is now pristine clean, totally static-free, and ready for use. It will also stay that way for a very long time, unless mishandled

    The same process is used for cleaning second-hand records (using the dedicated brush and nozzle for that purpose), although depending on how dirty the records are, this could affect steps 3) and 4), where more effort may be required to loosen off any 'crud', in order that it is removed thoroughly.

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

  2. #2
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

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    Default

    Thought I'd move this to a separate thread of its own, should anyone wish to refer to it. Cheers!

    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

  3. #3
    Join Date: Mar 2008

    Location: Dunfermline, Scotland, UK

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    I'm inthescottishmafia.

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    What do you use to make up your cleaning solution Marco?
    There are times when you canít do the sensible thing, when you canít act like a responsible adult at all; you just have to do whatever insane thing comes into your head. When bad people do it they end up murderers, when good people do it they end up heroes, and when the rest of us do it we end up looking like total idiots. But whenís that ever stopped us?

  4. #4
    Join Date: Jan 2008

    Location: Wrexham, North Wales, UK

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    Hi Ali,

    75% de-ionised water, 20% isopropyl alcohol and 5% own-brand supermarket washing-up liquid (such as Sainsbury's Basic range). I've found that works very well, and I can make up litres of the stuff for next to nothing!

    However, I've ordered some of this to try with my second-hand records, which I think will be very good: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Super-Enzy...item19c8d406ea



    Marco.
    http://www.thestainedglasscompany.com

    "A man is a success if he gets up in the morning and gets to bed at night, and in between he does what he wants to do" -- Milan Kundera.

  5. #5
    Join Date: Nov 2013

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    I'm Andr'e.


  6. #6
    Join Date: Mar 2012

    Location: Gloucestershire

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    I'm Paul.

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    "Archive" solution recipe as used by record libraries stateside and in the UK in bygone times:

    25% (max) lab grade 99.9% pure IPA;

    75% demineralised/de-ionised water;

    Add to this 0.5 to 1% by volume Ilford Ilfotol wetting agent (do not use older recipes such as Kodak Photoflo as the additives could leave a residue).

    Personally, I'd avoid using washing up liquid as it contains large amounts of salt but a little (as in a few drops per litre) may be ok.

  7. #7
    Join Date: Mar 2008

    Location: Dunfermline, Scotland, UK

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    I'm inthescottishmafia.

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    Cheers chaps, I'll have a look.
    There are times when you canít do the sensible thing, when you canít act like a responsible adult at all; you just have to do whatever insane thing comes into your head. When bad people do it they end up murderers, when good people do it they end up heroes, and when the rest of us do it we end up looking like total idiots. But whenís that ever stopped us?

  8. #8
    Join Date: Aug 2012

    Location: Hartlepool UK

    Posts: 1,263
    I'm Alan.

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    Ali
    A small bottle of this goes a long way http://www.garrard501.com/Test_L_ART_KNOSTI.pdf I mix with triple distilled water.
    I tried using the knosti stuff and I also used a mix as per Reffc above without washing up liquid but after trying this L'art du son the records are ultra clean and literally shine plus I noticed next to no static when you lift it off and when you use the brush on the record before playing it feels silky with no drag so I am impressed and will be getting another bottle when this one is gone, it really is worth the money IMO

    Alan
    Turntable - Garrard 401/Jelco 750L/Ortofon Kontrapunkt B, Pioneer PLC 590, SME 3009/2 , Denon DL103R - DIY Paradise Phono stage - Reel 2 Reel Studer A810, Otari MX55,Tascam BR20 - Digital HTPC / Young Dac - Preamp - DIY B4, 821, Power Amp's DIY Voyager Mono Block, Speakers Tannoy precision 6.4 / Wilmslow Kit Volt BM220.8 / Scanspeak D2905/9500

  9. #9
    Join Date: Dec 2011

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    I'm Gone.

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    Sorry folks but in my opinion L'art du Son is a complete no no and I say this with a heavy heart as Martina Schoener is a friend of mine and someone whose opinion in most things audio I respect. L'Art du Son fluid is, as I understand it, organic and many people report things grow in it. Now I know it says only make up the concentrate in small amounts, but I left an unopened bottle of concentrate in a cupboard for a few months and even the concentrate had strings growing in it. I have not done any tests but the thought that I was putting a growing medium on my records fills me with dread.

    BTW after a lot of research while I was working with Loricraft, we got the perfect mix of IPA, distilled water and wetting agent. Paul from Reffc almost has it right . I can't give the exact mix in case Loricraft want to sell it at a later date and it could be considered commercially confidential information.

  10. #10
    Join Date: May 2011

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    I'm Paul.

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    I have L'Art du Son and if you keep to small quantities at a time and refrigerate growths are almost eliminated. As far as it's use is concerned I would strongly recommend a rinse with an alcohol based cleaner or distilled water. I only now reserve it for problem discs were it may remove some stubborn deposits. It also alters the sound in a way that is not positive in my view pointing towards some being left in the grooves. Hence a strong suggestion it is thoroughly rinsed and vacuumed off after it's done it's cleaning job. Needless to say I rarely use it finding that the standard Okki Nokki concentrate does a very good job for the cost.

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